Author Topic: Old Photos of Conwy  (Read 52378 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

DaveR

  • Administrator
Re: Old Photos of Conwy
« Reply #45 on: October 13, 2010, 08:15:28 AM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Would that large building be the Council Offices at Bodlondeb?
I was thinking that was possibly the case but it looks too far to the left (unless the artist made a mistake). Looking on a modern aeral view, it would seem to be where Bryn Corach is now but its not the same building as Bryn Corach looks much smaller:

DaveR

  • Administrator
Re: Old Photos of Conwy
« Reply #46 on: October 13, 2010, 08:18:40 AM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Quote
A rather uncomfortable looking Mr T J Hughes, Conwy's Town Crier in 1875:

Did he found a department store in Liverpool?
Probably just a coincidence but who knows, I can't find any more information about him.

I did find another website of photos, though:
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Bri Roberts

  • Ad Free Member
  • *
Re: Old Photos of Conwy
« Reply #47 on: October 13, 2010, 08:29:42 AM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
Loading Fish on Conwy Quay 1961
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Judging by the hairline, that looks like my Uncle Dai standing behind the front two.

He was the foreman/driver for Oaklands Haulage who had a yard in Victoria Drive in Llandudno Junction and had the contract to take the fish down to London.

In the early sixties, I once went down with him to London Billingsgate to deliver the fish.

I've never forgotten that first visit to London.

DaveR

  • Administrator
Re: Old Photos of Conwy
« Reply #48 on: October 13, 2010, 09:13:07 AM »
 *&( The Quay looked much better in those days when it was actually used for something. These days, it seems a bit dull and lacking in character, just a place for people to eat their chips.  :(

DaveR

  • Administrator
Re: Old Photos of Conwy
« Reply #49 on: October 13, 2010, 09:15:46 AM »
J A Higginbottom Garage and Marine Engineers on the Quay in the 1930s:

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
« Last Edit: October 13, 2010, 09:53:46 AM by DaveR »

DaveR

  • Administrator
Re: Old Photos of Conwy
« Reply #50 on: October 24, 2010, 09:25:41 PM »
Some photos of the Quay in 2006. before all of the buildings on it were demolished.  :(

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login


Trojan

  • Member
Re: Old Photos of Conwy
« Reply #51 on: November 09, 2010, 11:01:26 PM »
Born in 1770, one of England’s earliest romantic poets - William Wordsworth - visited Conwy during a summer vacation. Here, he was inspired to write the poem about a small child who visits her family grave.

A small plaque and wrought iron frame now covers the little grave, which can be seen within the grounds of St Mary’s Parish Church.

—A simple child,
That lightly draws its breath,
And feels its life in every limb,
What should it know of death?

I met a little cottage girl:
She was eight years old, she said;
Her hair was thick with many a curl
That clustered round her head.

She had a rustic, woodland air,
And she was wildly clad;
Her eyes were fair, and very fair;
—Her beauty made me glad.

"Sisters and brothers, little maid,
How many may you be?"
"How many? Seven in all," she said,
And wondering looked at me.

"And where are they? I pray you tell."
She answered, "Seven are we;
And two of us at Conway dwell,
And two are gone to sea.

"Two of us in the churchyard lie,
My sister and my brother;
And in the churchyard cottage, I
Dwell near them with my mother."

"You say that two at Conway dwell,
And two are gone to sea,
Yet ye are seven! — I pray you tell,
Sweet maid, how this may be."

Then did the little maid reply,
"Seven boys and girls are we;
Two of us in the churchyard lie,
Beneath the churchyard tree."

"You run about, my little maid,
Your limbs they are alive;
If two are in the churchyard laid,
Then ye are only five."

"Their graves are green, they may be seen,"
The little maid replied,
"Twelve steps or more from my mother's door,
And they are side by side.

"My stockings there I often knit,
My kerchief there I hem;
And there upon the ground I sit,
And sing a song to them.

"And often after sunset, sir,
When it is light and fair,
I take my little porringer,
And eat my supper there.

"The first that died was sister Jane;
In bed she moaning lay,
Till God released her of her pain;
And then she went away.

"So in the churchyard she was laid;
And, when the grass was dry,
Together round her grave we played,
My brother John and I.

"And when the ground was white with snow,
And I could run and slide,
My brother John was forced to go,
And he lies by her side."

"How many are you, then," said I,
"If they two are in heaven?"
Quick was the little maid's reply,
"O master! we are seven."

"But they are dead; those two are dead!
Their spirits are in heaven!"
'T was throwing words away; for still
The little maid would have her will,
And say, "Nay, we are seven!"
« Last Edit: November 09, 2010, 11:19:18 PM by Trojan »



Trojan

  • Member
Re: Old Photos of Conwy
« Reply #52 on: November 09, 2010, 11:34:04 PM »
The Castle and Telford suspension bridge from differing eras.

The last one is from the late '30's.

Trojan

  • Member
Re: Old Photos of Conwy
« Reply #53 on: November 09, 2010, 11:37:33 PM »
The castle entrance:

Pendragon

  • Member
Re: Old Photos of Conwy
« Reply #54 on: November 09, 2010, 11:48:43 PM »
We are seven is a lovely poem but it's just that. Much the same as Bedd Gelet (one of my favourite welsh stories) until I read an old book and it explained the story was merely a ploy by a south walian landlord who wanted to boost trade in his pub in the victorian era. Gutted I was Gutted.

I bet the "ugly house" was lies too..............................................................please say no!!!
Only hindsight has 20/20 vision
Angiegram - A romantic notion derived from the more mundane truth.

Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you; you just gotta find the ones worth suffering for." -Bob Marley

Trojan

  • Member
Re: Old Photos of Conwy
« Reply #55 on: November 09, 2010, 11:56:01 PM »
You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login
We are seven is a lovely poem but it's just that. Much the same as Bedd Gelet (one of my favourite welsh stories) until I read an old book and it explained the story was merely a ploy by a south walian landlord who wanted to boost trade in his pub in the victorian era. Gutted I was Gutted.

I bet the "ugly house" was lies too..............................................................please say no!!!

Yes, I also read about the true meaning of Gelert's grave.

Here's the story of Ty Hyll and the two outlaw brothers that built it. You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Trojan

  • Member
Re: Old Photos of Conwy
« Reply #56 on: November 09, 2010, 11:58:38 PM »
From the Ugly House we now turn to the smallest house in Great Britain:

(Looks like a scary character standing outside  :o)

Trojan

  • Member
Re: Old Photos of Conwy
« Reply #57 on: November 10, 2010, 12:04:43 AM »
A misty morning on the Conwy:

(Note the Anglicized spelling on the majority of these old postcards)

Trojan

  • Member
Re: Old Photos of Conwy
« Reply #58 on: November 10, 2010, 12:11:48 AM »
Various views of the Conwy Morfa Army Camp:

Trojan

  • Member
Re: Old Photos of Conwy
« Reply #59 on: November 10, 2010, 12:17:07 AM »
Four more: