Author Topic: Renwable energy in the area  (Read 4959 times)

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Fester

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Re: Wind farm developments locally.
« Reply #15 on: January 25, 2012, 12:09:24 PM »
I hereby award this year's (Forum) Nobel prize for Science to.......(drum roll).........IAN!

Merddin Emrys gets the runners up prize.
Fester...
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Quiggs

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Re: Wind farm developments locally.
« Reply #16 on: January 25, 2012, 12:36:49 PM »
If Hydrogen becomes the fuel of the future, perhaps the windfarms could produce Hydrogen by electrolysis and store it out at sea  in a safe environment, only piping it ashore as required. Just a thought.   D) 
Dictum Meum Pactum

Llechwedd

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Wind Farms
« Reply #17 on: February 27, 2012, 11:50:50 AM »
There's a very interesting piece in todays (Monday) Guardian - "Wind Farms axed as UK loses its taste for tubines".  Two double page spreads and a map.  Sorry I don't know how to scan but Gwynt Y Mor will have 168 and be ready in 2014 and be the fifth largest the other four large ones being on the east coast.

Fester

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Re: Wind farm developments locally.
« Reply #18 on: October 22, 2014, 01:14:58 AM »
Due to 8 of the UK's 15 nuclear power stations being 'offline' on Tuesday, apparently the UK's windfarms contributed MORE to the National Grid than any other source. (about 14% of the total)

This will be a temporary anomaly, as the UK Govt is giving massive subsidies and major priority to building more Nuclear sites.
At the same time they are blocking any more rural or offshore developments of windfarms.
I makes you wonder whether it was all worthwhile.

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Fester...
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SteveH

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Re: Wind farm developments locally.
« Reply #19 on: October 23, 2014, 01:58:51 PM »
CABLES: Our reporter Dave Powell is reporting from a Conwy council meeting: "Conwy councillors vote to change policy so Conwy demands that all cabling running in Conwy from North Wales Windfarms Connections Project should be placed underground not via overhead pylons."  DPblog

Fester

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Re: Wind farm developments locally.
« Reply #20 on: June 09, 2015, 12:27:50 AM »
I think it's worth pointing out, after all is now said and done.... that the Windfarms in view from Llandudno Bay ARE a blight on the landscape (seascape?)
They probably belong more appropriately in the topic 'Local Eyesores'
They look absolutely terrible by day, and even worse by night.   &shake& &shake&
Fester...
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SteveH

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Re: Wind farm developments locally.
« Reply #21 on: June 18, 2015, 12:32:08 PM »
£2bn Gwynt y Mor wind farm officially opens off Llandudno

The wind farm covers an area of 31 square miles (80 sq km) and includes an offshore substation, weighing 1,500 tonnes.
It has taken 12 years to get off the ground and was not without its opposition from campaigners and councillors, worried about the visual impact and its effect on tourism and the seascape.
The original proposals were scaled down and planning permission was granted in 2008 by the then Energy Secretary, Ed Miliband.
Up to 100 jobs will be created at Mostyn docks, near Holywell, Flintshire, to service the turbines.
Even larger wind farms are being built in the North Sea, with an incentive of £155 per megawatt hour from the government.

The UK Government meanwhile has announced it is to end  :( :( :( subsidies for new onshore wind farms from April 2016.
It costs twice as much to build them out to sea than it does on land.RefBBC



SteveH

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Re: Wind farm developments locally. WINDFALL FOR CONWY
« Reply #22 on: August 24, 2015, 05:37:48 PM »
Wind farm to provide a windfall for Conwy

MORE than £19million has been made available to communities in Conwy by an offshore wind farm fund.

The Gwynt y Môr Offshore Wind Farm fund will be distributed throughout the lifetime of the project, and is now open for small applications up to £10,000 and for grants over £10,000.

Paul Cowling, managing director of RWE Innogy UK, said: “Communities hosting our projects are especially important to us.
“We are proud that RWE will be changing many lives for the good over the lifetime of the Gwynt y y Môr wind farm, creating a lasting legacy with an investment of more than £19 million.”
Launched in July, the fund is independently managed by Community and Voluntary Support Conwy (CVSC).

An independent advisory panel is now in place, comprising of community representatives from each of the counties as well as independent experts. They will meet on a quarterly basis to assess applications.

A wide range of enquiries have been received to date. From localised groups seeking no more than £500 for local community improvements, to larger more strategic cross county projects focussing on safety, education, training and the mentoring of young people into employment.
Wendy Jones CVSC’s chief officer, added: “The Gwynt y Môr grants programme provides us all with a great platform to create a positive and lasting impact on our communities not just today but well into the future.”
REF NWpioneer

Applications are still being encouraged, and for more information on
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SteveH

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TIDAL ENERGY
« Reply #23 on: March 24, 2016, 03:03:39 PM »
Last year there was an article re. Tidal power in "Everything to do with Rhos on Sea" Reply 406  13/6/15

Now a new local company is looking at the prospect.....

Tidal energy review must look at jobs and flood defences says company planning to build a lagoon off North Wales

A company set up to develop a £7bn tidal energy scheme along the coast of North Wales says the scope of the latest review into tidal power is too narrow.
According to the North Wales Tidal Energy and Coast Protection Company (NWTE), the review of the sector announced by the UK Government should also include coastal protection and the economic benefits it would bring in its wake.

The company says its proposals would generate 2GW of electricity and create thousands of jobs during the construction phase.
St Asaph-based NWTE says it aims to work with local communities and business people to create a “world-leading tidal energy programme” and flood protection for places such as Colwyn Bay, Rhyl and St Asaph.
The company behind the planned Swansea Bay tidal lagoon, Tidal Lagoon Power, is also planning a lagoon in Colwyn Bay.
The chairman of NWTE said his company's scheme would provide much-needed coastal protection for vital strategic assets and communities where people currently live with the constant fear of devastating floods.

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SteveH

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Re: TIDAL ENERGY
« Reply #24 on: April 05, 2016, 11:26:05 AM »
Experts focus on tidal power bid for north Wales
The challenges facing a bid to build a tidal lagoon covering 270 sq miles of the north Wales coast are the focus of a global marine conference.
The proposed North Wales Tidal Energy project (NWTE) would stretch from Llandudno to Prestatyn.
Backers claim it would generate enough electricity to power 750,000 homes - and help protect the coastline.
The plans are being discussed at a two-day event in Caernarfon, Gwynedd, with experts from 12 countries.
"What we are trying to do is to understand the physical environment, first of all, off the north Wales coast, so we have a good understanding of the physical processes - the whole eco-marine environment," explained Prof John Reynolds, who is one of the directors of the NWTE project.
"We've said right from the outset of the project, we said the whole element of the project is going to be research-led, it's going to be science-led."
Those involved in the project are already collaborating with Bangor University, which is hosting the fifth Marine and River Dune Dynamics conference at Caernarfon, Gwynedd.
It brings together marine scientists from South Korea, China, America, and Europe, with Prof Reynolds giving a keynote address on the lagoon scheme.

It is estimated that the whole project could cost £7bn, taking five years to build.
"North Wales is excellently suited for this tidal impoundment scheme as it displays one of the highest tidal ranges of the UK coastline," added Prof Reynolds.
"However, the underpinning technical challenges associated with the mobile seabed should not be overlooked."
The project envisages a wall being built out to sea, stretching between the seaside coastal resort of Llandudno in Conwy county over to Prestatyn in Denbighshire.
The barrier would house turbines to generate electricity, driven by the tidal force pushing through the wall.
In addition to generating electricity, the lagoon would bolster sea defences, in an area that is waging a constant battle against coastal flooding.
Those behind the lagoon claimed that "doing nothing" off the coast would cost up to £750m over the next 100 years in flood defence bills, a drop in coastal property prices, and the loss of inward investment.

However, it remains very early days for the tidal project, which is still bidding to attract the investment it needs to proceed.
It also faces competition from those behind plans for the Swansea lagoon scheme, who have also identified Colwyn Bay in Conwy county as another potential location for a tidal power scheme.
However, those plans - along with the Swansea project - are on hold, after the UK government announced its own review in February into the viability of tidal power across Britain.
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SteveH

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Re: TIDAL ENERGY
« Reply #25 on: April 12, 2016, 01:56:26 PM »
Multi-billion pound tidal lagoon from Prestatyn to Llandudno will not happen 'overnight'
Speaking after a two-day conference, held in Caernarfon last on April 4, with leaders in science and the environment to discuss the North Wales Tidal Energy and Coast Protection scheme, Henry Dixon, chairman of North Wales Tidal Energy, said the project's planning phase could take up to five years.

The scheme will focus on integrating coastal protection and preventing flooding in areas such as Colwyn Bay, St Asaph and Rhyl, and could potentially generate electricity for up to 75,000 homes.

Mr Dixon, said: “This project will be similar to the Swansea scheme. We want to see if we can provide coastal protection whilst alleiviating flooding problems and generating electrcity.
“If we can build this and alleviate flood and insurance risk this can help with employment, economic regeneration, enhance tourism and create more business.
“This conference is to discuss the science of what is happening on the sea bed, with the sand, environment, fish, birds and how will it all be effected. We want to make sure we understand the science and broader community.”

The company, based in St Asaph, is still in the process of finding funding for the scheme but have engaged in dialouged with Natural Resources Wales and hope that the formal planning process will begin next year.

Mr Dixon added: “This is something that will not happen over night. For planning it will be a long process - possibly five years.
“This fits with the new Growth for North Wales Agenda, giving it a good impetus into the next generation.”
The company’s proposals would generate 2GW of natural, renewable energy and Mr Dixon said in the process it would create thousands of construction jobs, dramatically transforming the region's economic prosperity.

North Wales Tidal Energy aims to work with local communities and business people to create a "world-leading tidal energy programme".

Speaking at the conference Professor John Reynolds, managing director of near-surface geophysics consultancy company Reynolds International, said: “This conference on marine and river dune dynamics brings together the relevant expertise to help gain a science-led understanding of the way sediments would move around a tidal impoundment.

“North Wales is excellently suited for this tidal impoundment scheme as it displays one of the highest tidal ranges of the UK coast line.”
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SteveH

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Re: Wind farm developments locally.
« Reply #26 on: June 15, 2016, 10:56:19 AM »
North Wales wind farm bomb exploded.
The first of three unexploded WWII  bombs found near a windfarm has been detonated at sea.
 RWE Innogy UK, which is building the  160-turbine Gwynt y Môr windfarm,  claimed that nothing could be seen from  shore in the noon blast and that there  was “little impact on the sea surface”.

 The underwater explosion measured 1.1 on the  Richter Scale according to the  British Geological Survey -  it must be at  least 2.5 to be felt on the sea surface.
 RWE is working with Ramora UK, a  specialist bomb disposal company, and  other contractors to carry out further controlled explosions.

 David Welch, Ramora UK’s managing director and senior explosives officer,  described such finds are “common”.
 He said: “The offshore renewable energy sector is a key and growing market  for our specialist bomb disposal services.
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SteveH

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Re: Tidal energy
« Reply #27 on: June 25, 2018, 06:27:41 PM »
Bad news for the above mentioned Tidal energy/ coastal protection scheme.

Plans to build the world's first tidal power lagoon have been thrown out by the UK government.

Business and Energy Secretary Greg Clark said the £1.3bn project was not value for money, despite claims by developers Tidal Lagoon Power (TLP) a revised offer made it cheaper.

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mull

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Re: Renwable energy in the area
« Reply #28 on: June 25, 2018, 08:47:45 PM »
Have a look at what the developer wanted to do in Cornwall to source his stone.

What is wrong with welsh stone ?
More to all this than meets the eye .


SteveH

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Re: Renwable energy in the area Tidal energy
« Reply #29 on: June 27, 2018, 01:16:23 PM »
The company behind plans for a North Wales tidal lagoon that could create 20,000 jobs and generate more than £11 billion for the regional economy has vowed to press ahead with the scheme.

Henry Dixon, the chairman of North Wales Tidal Energy (NWTE), the group leading the project, said he was not deterred by the UK Government’s decision to reject a tidal lagoon project in Swansea.

In announcing the decision, Business and Energy Secretary Greg Clark said the Swansea scheme was not value for money.

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