Author Topic: Everything to do with the Conwy Valley  (Read 11171 times)

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Hugo

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Re: Everything to do with the Conwy Valley
« Reply #29 on: February 10, 2013, 10:11:19 PM »
Linda,  the easiest way I can describe it is:- from Gwydr Castle take the main road to Trefriw and after about 150 yards on your left you will see a wooden gate that goes into the public car park of the Wood Mill.
Go into the car park and take the path on the right going upwards after about 50 yards you will see the waterfall.  Well worth the visit and I hope that you enjoy it.

Hugo

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Re: Everything to do with the Conwy Valley
« Reply #30 on: February 11, 2013, 10:38:46 PM »
There's also a nice little man made waterfall lower down than the Mares Tails one, it'll be nice if you see both of them.

Linda

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Re: Everything to do with the Conwy Valley
« Reply #31 on: February 11, 2013, 11:03:26 PM »
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Linda,  the easiest way I can describe it is:- from Gwydr Castle take the main road to Trefriw and after about 150 yards on your left you will see a wooden gate that goes into the public car park of the Wood Mill.
Go into the car park and take the path on the right going upwards after about 50 yards you will see the waterfall.  Well worth the visit and I hope that you enjoy it.
Thankyou for the directions, we certainly will take a look, lovely photos. We are so lucky to have these little gems so close by  $thanx$

DaveR

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Re: Everything to do with the Conwy Valley
« Reply #32 on: March 11, 2013, 08:07:48 PM »
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With a decent chef and a good manager the Tal-Y-Cafn could do very well.  It's worth remembering that people are prepared to travel quite a distance once they find a place that serves good food at a decent price. That's how the Maenan Abbey has done so well, and continues to do well. The Tal-Y-Cafn is also situated rather nicely, with a train station next to it, good views if they re-jigged the interior and a reasonable distance from the three main towns.  In the right hands it could be a little gold mine, I suspect.
It would seem that we're not the only people who consider the Tal Y Cafn Hotel a good bet:
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A CLOSED Conwy Valley coaching house is to be redeveloped as a bar and restaurant.

Plans have been submitted to renew the Tal y Cafn Hotel by a North Wales property development group, which will see the tavern turned into a restaurant.

The pub, which closed in early 2011, was built in the 16th century and served as an inn and coach house for travellers crossing at the nearby ferry.

Developers Edwards Property Management (EPM) and Castell Developments, based in Colwyn Bay, acquired the pub in 2011, and have been drafting plans.

These include a new roof structure, a new layout for the car park and other alterations to bring it back into use as a restaurant and public house.

John Sanderson, development manager for Castell Developments, said: “We're looking at extending the building and raising the height of the roof, but it's fairly minimal in terms of development.

“Historically, it had a very good food trade, and it's well-remembered in the Conwy area. That's why we want to get it back.”

Blongb

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Re: Everything to do with the Conwy Valley
« Reply #33 on: March 11, 2013, 09:22:10 PM »
Let’s keep our fingers crossed Dave and hope it’s a successful re-development  ZXZ
-- Now I can only sit and stare--

DaveR

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Re: Everything to do with the Conwy Valley
« Reply #34 on: March 11, 2013, 09:27:19 PM »
I hope so, it's certainly an eyesore at the moment.

Fester

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Re: Everything to do with the Conwy Valley
« Reply #35 on: March 21, 2013, 02:06:10 PM »
Some good coverage for our area on both the BBC and ITV News today.

In the Conwy Valley, it showed the construction of a large new 'underground' reservoir, by Dwr Cymru.
It looks very impressive, and the project will be complete this year.

It is the size of 10 Olympic size swimming pools, and is designed to guarantee water supply to the Llandudno and Colwyn Bay areas in times of hot weather or drought.
Fester...
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Ian

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Re: Everything to do with the Conwy Valley
« Reply #36 on: March 21, 2013, 02:13:28 PM »
It isn't really that much underground at the moment. Looks suitably enormous from the road leading up from Black Cat to Llanwrst road. The major road works in the A470 just before Glan Conwy are where the output will Join the mains.
“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.”   ― Michel de Montaigne

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Fester

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Re: Everything to do with the Conwy Valley
« Reply #37 on: March 21, 2013, 02:18:27 PM »
Correct Ian, it is fully exposed whilst being constructed on two levels, then it will be 'roofed' and grassed over.
Fester...
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Hugo

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Re: Everything to do with the Conwy Valley
« Reply #38 on: March 23, 2013, 05:55:40 PM »
There is a photo of Rowen in the snow amongst this link.

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Ian

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Re: Everything to do with the Conwy Valley
« Reply #39 on: July 27, 2013, 07:59:54 AM »
This is something of a cautionary tale, but for all using gas it's worth reading.

About three weeks ago an activities centre on the side of Crafnant was being given a routine inspection by the warden. When he entered the main building, he smelt gas, rather strongly. Knowing about the dangers fo switching on lights, he stayed well away from any and made his way into the kitchen, where the smell seemed strongest.  He opened the oven door and there was an explosion and fireball. He suffered 15% burns and was taken from Llandudno A & E to Glan Clwyd, who then sent him to Whiston Burns unit, where he remained for ten days.  He's still experiencing immense pain when trying to move.

Obviously, everyone was keen to know what provided the source of ignition, since the leak was traced to a flexible hose connection at the rear of the cooker, but no obvious catalyst for the explosion was found.  Then they looked up and found the permanently-on fly zapper. The conclusion is that because Propane is heaver than air, a dense layer of the stuff would have built up near the floor and not reached the zapper.  However, when the warden entered the kitchen, he agitated the gas simply by moving through it and opening the oven door probably provided sufficient agitation to cause the gas to reach the zapper.  If a fly - possibly following the warden in - was zapped at that point, then the spark would have been enough. He's lucky to be alive, because the explosion lifted the roof of the place.
“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.”   ― Michel de Montaigne

Si hoc legere scis, nimis eruditionis habes.

Fester

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Re: Everything to do with the Conwy Valley
« Reply #40 on: July 28, 2013, 12:46:48 AM »
Smelling gas is an interesting, and often confusing situation to find oneself in.

When I was having my (nightmare) extension built, we could often smell gas and the (rogue) builders kept assuring me that all was well.    Sometime later, worried by the continued smell, I called the emergency gas number and to cut a long story short, the builders were criminally negligent, we were lucky not to be killed, and they were lucky not to be banged up in prison.

Sometime later, I smelled gas, had it checked out, and was told by the technician that it was just my boiler firing up and it was normal. Fair enough.

One night last week, we were sat outside The Gresham Bar waiting for DaveR, and once again I smelled Gas, quite strongly for a few minutes.  I reported it to the barman, who shrugged his shoulders and was not too interested.

How is one to know when an incident of smelling gas is crucial, compared to one that isn't?
One's LIFE can depend on the answer to that.

I have posted on this Forum before about the GAS SAFE sticker on plumbers vans.  Many have one, but many of them are fraudulent and criminal.... as there is NO REGISTRATION NUMBER beneath the sticker.  That number is the certification they need to operate legally.
Take heed of this, as many GAS SAFE plumbers in the Llandudno area, are not what they seem.   :o :o
Fester...
- Semper in Excretum, Sole Profundum Variat -

Yorkie

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Re: Everything to do with the Conwy Valley
« Reply #41 on: July 28, 2013, 06:42:09 AM »
There are also some Gas Safe Heating Engineers who are less than honest when it comes to changing parts that do not need changing.   Unfortunately Joe Public generally has no idea of what's wrong with his system and can be bamboozled by any unscrupulous operator.   These operators, be they large or small, are generally well qualified but just choose to want to make the quick Buck at the expense of the punter.    :rage:
Wise men have something to say.
Fools have to say something.
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Bri Roberts

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Re: Everything to do with the Conwy Valley
« Reply #42 on: July 28, 2013, 06:50:36 AM »
Always ask to see a Gas Safe ID Card.

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Ian

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Re: Everything to do with the Conwy Valley
« Reply #43 on: July 28, 2013, 08:00:18 AM »
Quote
How is one to know when an incident of smelling gas is crucial, compared to one that isn't?
One's LIFE can depend on the answer to that.

I was involved in a gas explosion many years ago and that's left me with a life-long wariness of gas.  This incident was Propane related and the smell added to propane is very strong, for good reason. But if you can smell it at all it can ignite, so my solution if I smell it is to get out, fast, leaving all the doors and windows I can reach on the way wide open, and head for the tank, where I turn it off, then wait - for a long time :-)

However, here's an interesting anecdote. Our house is fed from a standing Propane tank that holds about 2000 litres of the stuff. It's a good distance from the house itself but a few years ago it ran out. The way I knew it had run out was the incredibly pungent smell of Gas around the tank.  And the fact that the stove wouldn't light  :-X . We called the Gas people in, and the chap who came, after testing all the piping, etc., told us that when the tank was nearly empty this smell would then somehow make its way outside the tank. So, essentially, what he was saying was that the smell was because the added olfactory chemicals could escape when the gas couldn't.  In fact, I think he was talking nonsense and that we'd actually had a leak from the outside pipework connections. He'd done a 'routine' tightening of all the joints, and that had probably cured the thing, which - meanwhile - had lost quite a lot of gas.

In Scotland, a couple of years ago, a factory reliant on tanked gas suffered an explosion which killed two men. The subsequent investigation revealed that the pipes from the tank had been laid beneath the concrete floor of the factory and the concrete mix had eventually corroded the pipes until they'd perforated. 
“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.”   ― Michel de Montaigne

Si hoc legere scis, nimis eruditionis habes.