Author Topic: Everything to do with Rhos On Sea  (Read 113916 times)

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Ian

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Re: Everything to do with Rhos On Sea
« Reply #29 on: January 19, 2011, 06:34:22 PM »
It's going to be tricky, getting a tracked vehicle out.
“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.”   ― Michel de Montaigne

Si hoc legere scis, nimis eruditionis habes.

Merddin Emrys

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Re: Everything to do with Rhos On Sea
« Reply #30 on: January 19, 2011, 06:44:57 PM »
the digger's still stuck
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and they've recovered the truck, I was told this was brand new :o
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a touch muddy!
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Two Matadors today, still earning a living, great vehicles!
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A pigeon is for life not just Christmas

Yorkie

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Re: Everything to do with Rhos On Sea
« Reply #31 on: January 19, 2011, 07:18:40 PM »
All they need to get the Case Excavator free is a big Mobile Crane to lift whilst they hose underneath to release the suction.   It's not the first time this sort of thing has happened.

I can't understand why they didn't use a low ground pressure Excavator for the job.

ormegolf

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Re: Everything to do with Rhos On Sea
« Reply #32 on: January 19, 2011, 07:41:58 PM »
This is most depressing----I've been in transport for a lot of my life and two of the owners involved today (Buckleys crane hire and Jennings) I know personally. Buckleys, of course, were only involved in the rescue. However, on a brighter side, the Rhos thread has never got going in the new forum but yesterday it leaped  from Page 1 to 3!!! P.S. In case anyone is interested, Dewi Jones, the boss of Jennings is Towyn's golden boy, started out in a shed in his back garden around 35 years ago and is definately the most successful business man out of the village.

Merddin Emrys

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Re: Everything to do with Rhos On Sea
« Reply #33 on: January 19, 2011, 07:43:02 PM »
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All they need to get the Case Excavator free is a big Mobile Crane to lift whilst they hose underneath to release the suction.   It's not the first time this sort of thing has happened.

I can't understand why they didn't use a low ground pressure Excavator for the job.

Ah, but what would you put the big mobile crane on? its just mud all around
A pigeon is for life not just Christmas

Yorkie

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Re: Everything to do with Rhos On Sea
« Reply #34 on: January 19, 2011, 08:12:43 PM »
Nearest available point to give adequate support.  Size of crane would be determined by reach needed and load to be lifted.  The Excavator's weight could be reduced by some dismantling e.g. the arm and bucket assembly.

I haven't seen the actual position of the thing that is stuck but having had much experience of erecting and dismantling using mobile cranes I have never seen a situation that has proved impossible.  Mobile cranes of 500 ton capacity are available - at a cost!

This is a Liebherr 500 ton Mobile - the company I worked for.  Owned by Ainscough Crane Hire.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2011, 08:14:48 PM by Yorkie »

DaveR

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Re: Everything to do with Rhos On Sea
« Reply #35 on: January 19, 2011, 08:56:29 PM »
Those AEC Matadors must date back to 1939 - I seem to recall the lady from Buckleys saying they were ex-army from WWII:
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She has a Flickr site, btw:
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Merddin Emrys

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Re: Everything to do with Rhos On Sea
« Reply #36 on: January 19, 2011, 10:11:20 PM »
The driver said one was 1942 and the other 1944 (hopefully I've remembered it correctly!)
I remember making model Matadors from Airfix kits  D)
A pigeon is for life not just Christmas

Ian

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Re: Everything to do with Rhos On Sea
« Reply #37 on: January 20, 2011, 08:05:36 AM »
Quote
Ah, but what would you put the big mobile crane on? its just mud all around

I suppose if all else failed they could use a floating crane. Or might that have too great a draft?
“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.”   ― Michel de Montaigne

Si hoc legere scis, nimis eruditionis habes.

DaveR

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Re: Everything to do with Rhos On Sea
« Reply #38 on: January 20, 2011, 08:08:37 AM »
I think they're going to carry on trying to pull it out - you can't get a crane close enough, as far as I can see.

Hugo

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Re: Everything to do with Rhos On Sea
« Reply #39 on: January 20, 2011, 08:37:49 AM »
I can see the crane partly covered by the sea which I think must be on its way out. It'll be a while before they can start the rescue again today.

DaveR

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Re: Everything to do with Rhos On Sea
« Reply #40 on: January 20, 2011, 08:43:37 AM »
The BBC website has got it wrong again:

"Two heavy plant vehicles have been released from mud on the beach at Rhos on Sea in Conwy.

The owners of the dumper truck and a tracked earth-mover had to wait until Wednesday afternoon to recover them."

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Nemesis

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Re: Everything to do with Rhos On Sea
« Reply #41 on: January 20, 2011, 08:44:44 AM »
The Svanen floating catamaran crane was used during the last windfarm construction, that would be way too large.
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Yorkie

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Re: Everything to do with Rhos On Sea
« Reply #42 on: January 20, 2011, 04:27:23 PM »
When I visited this afternoon it looked as theough they were taking the Excavator apart piece by piece.  I did not realise that it was over by the breakwater - definitely not a crane job from on shore!   Dismantling is probably the only option.   It has certainly drawn a good crowd of sightseers.     Z**

DaveR

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Re: Everything to do with Rhos On Sea
« Reply #43 on: January 20, 2011, 05:47:02 PM »
The whole thing is now approaching farce proportions. There had to be nearly 30 men working on it today, with vehicles parked all over the prom. There are at least 4 excavators working around the stranded digger, with floodlights on masts illuminating the situation. How much is all this costing and who is paying?

EDIT: Even better, the whole area is now enveloped in thick fog!
« Last Edit: January 20, 2011, 05:54:07 PM by DaveR »