Author Topic: Consumer news and scams  (Read 53751 times)

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Ian

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Consumer news and scams
« Reply #-1 on: September 10, 2010, 07:44:26 PM »
Electricity meter top-up scam warning
Doorstep electricity meter 'deals' aren't genuine


08 September 2010
Electricity meter

Consumers are being warned about a doorstep scam promising cheap electricity which actually ends up costing them twice as much for their energy.

According to energy companies and government consumer body Consumer Focus, an estimated 85,000 households have been hit by the illegal sale of electricity meter top-ups.

The scam works by selling £50 worth of electricity credit to prepayment meter customers in exchange for a cash payment of just £25 - but customers end up paying twice because the money doesn't going to their energy supplier.

Visit the Top Up Safe website or call Consumer Direct on 08454 04 05 06 if you think you've been affected.


According to Christine McGourty, director at the Energy Retail Association, a body which represents energy companies: 'Just like when you buy something fake online - like a ticket for a football match or a music concert - you're the one who'll end up losing out in the end.

'Energy companies can detect the fraud and you'll end up paying twice for your electricity, first to the criminal and then again to your energy company, who can always detect when electricity has been used, but not paid for through the proper channels.'

Consumer Focus is urging electricity prepayment meter customers to only buy top-ups via an official seller - such as the Post Office, Paypoint or Payzone - and to be 'on the alert for anyone who comes to their doorstep claiming to sell electricity credit' as part of a national campaign.

Crimestoppers also pledged its support and is calling for consumers to contact them anonymously on 0800 555 111 or via the Crimestoppers website if they know someone illegally selling electricity top-ups.

« Last Edit: January 01, 2017, 09:41:16 AM by Ian »
“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.”   ― Michel de Montaigne

Si hoc legere scis, nimis eruditionis habes.

Ian

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Re: Consumer news and scams
« on: September 10, 2010, 07:46:47 PM »
Cybercrime hits two thirds of web users
Norton survey reveals extent of internet threat


Cybercrime including computer viruses, online credit card fraud and identity theft has hit over 59% of adults in the UK or around 30 million people, according to a survey.

The average cost to victims is £103 per person, which adds up a total of around £3 billion to UK consumers, claims report titled The Norton Cybercrime Report: The Human Impact.

As well as the financial impact the report shows that cybercrime has a significant emotional impact on its victims. The strongest reactions are feeling angry (58%), annoyed (51%) and cheated (40 %); in many cases, victims blame themselves for being attacked.

Former cybercrime victim, Michelle, for example told us she felt awful ‘guilt and anxiety’ when she fell victim to a fake ticketing website. Michelle paid for tickets to the Tea in the Park concert using her mother’s credit card but the tickets didn’t arrive and, by the time she realised it was a scam, over £700 had been drawn from her mother’s account.

‘I felt awful,’ says Michelle. ‘No-one can afford to lose that amount of money and it was worse that it was my mother’s money. It was horrendous. When you realise you’ve been had and it’s someone else’s money it was the worst thing.’

When you realise you’ve been had and it’s someone else’s money it was the worst thing

Of the 7,000 people surveyed only 3% don’t think it will happen to them while 80% do not expect cybercriminals to be brought to justice.

‘We accept cybercrime because of a “learned helplessness”,’ said Joseph LaBrie, PhD, associate professor of psychology at Loyola Marymount University.

Worryingly, people are doing little to prevent themselves becoming a victim of cybercrime. Only half (51%) of adults saying they would change their behaviour if they became a victim. Even scarier, fewer than half (44%) reported the crime to the police.
Solving internet crimes is frustrating. It takes an average of 28 days to resolve a cybercrime, and the average cost to resolve that crime is $334 (£217).

Despite the hassle, reporting a cybercrime is critical, says Norton lead cyber security advisor Adam Palmer. ‘We all pay for cybercrime, either directly or through pass-along costs from our financial institutions. If you fail to report a loss, you may actually be helping the criminal stay under the radar.’
Cybercrime victims out in the cold

Sadly, future victims of cybercrime in the UK will struggle to find the emotional support that they need with charity E-victims.org facing closure.

The charity has stopped sending out its email advisory service after running out of cash. Jennifer Perry, the charity’s founder told Which? Computing: ‘I’d sought funding from various government departments, the internet industry and from business. But funding hasn’t been forthcoming.’

The information on the E-Victims site will remain for a further six to 12 months but the service won’t answer individual queries or send out its scam alert.

The website’s demise is a serious blow for victims. ‘It was the only place where consumers could get direct, hands-on expertise on internet-related crime,’ said Howard Lamb, the Federation Against Copyright Theft’s internet liaison officer. ‘I don’t know where people can go now,’ he added.
Action Fraud service won’t plug the gap

The newly-created Action Fraud (AF) service is unlikely to plug the gap left by the E-Victims service.

Which? Computing reader Peter Bulloch called Action Fraud to report a cold caller pretending to be from Microsoft but the service refused to create a fraud report about the case.

An AF spokesperson clarified the agency’s role. ‘AF was set up to provide a place of support and advice for victims of e-crime. We’re there for victims of e-crime, but we also provide advice on how to stop people becoming victims.

‘If consumers wish to alert the authorities of a fraud or they have escaped being defrauded themselves then they should report the incident to Consumer Direct or Scambusters, part of the Office of Fair Trading.’
Protect yourself from cybercrime

Consumers should ensure that they have up-to-date security software to protect themselves from cybercrime. The release of The Norton Cybercrime Report coincides with the launch of Norton AntiVirus and Norton Internet Security 2011.
“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.”   ― Michel de Montaigne

Si hoc legere scis, nimis eruditionis habes.

Ian

  • Administrator
Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2010, 08:04:33 AM »
"Good day,

It took me a lot of time to summon courage to email you. It is a fact that we have not had any previous business dealings, but I strongly believe that with understanding and trust we can have a successful business relationship.

My name is Craig Jones, the Chief financial officer of New Zealand's Oil & Gas Company Ltd. For proper confirmation, visit You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

We have been on a project called The Kupe project. This project is to be the first phase development of gas field discoveries first made by New Zealand Oil and Gas (NZOG) in 1986. The project was given the final go ahead to move into the construction phase in July 2006. However, a large amount of design, assessment and pre-development work preceded this decision. For proper verification on this project, visit You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

I have access to very vital information that can be used to move a huge amount of money out of the project account to a secured account. I have done my homework very well .I have the machineries in place to get it done since I am still in active service. If it was possible for me to do it alone I would not have bothered contacting you, ultimately I need an honest foreigner to play an important role in the completion of this business deal.

Kindly get back to me for the next line of action if you are willing to commence. I look forward to meeting you in person and doing good business with you and please treat as confidential.

You can reach me on my private email : You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login

Signed:

Craig Jones

CFO- NZOG "
“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.”   ― Michel de Montaigne

Si hoc legere scis, nimis eruditionis habes.

Yorkie

  • Guest
Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2010, 08:46:41 AM »
Thanks for the info Ian.

I would like a part of the action so have rushed off a mail to Craig Jones indicating my interest in his enterprise.    Assuming that he will require details of my various bank accounts for me to receive my great wadge of the cash I have given him full details of all my various accounts so he will have no problem with making the correct deposits.

I hope you approve of my actions and will welcome me as a new milllionaire once the money comes flooding in.


Fester

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  • El Baldito
Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2010, 12:54:58 PM »
Ha ha .. nice one Yorkie ...
But just in case you forgot, I too have sent him details of YOUR bank accounts ....well, I didn't want to risk you missing out!
I knew you would appreciate it.



Fester...
- Semper in Excretum, Sole Profundum Variat -

Yorkie

  • Guest
Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2010, 03:29:57 PM »
Gosh - and I did the same thing for you with all your accounts, well knowing that you would love to be in on such an opportunity!
   _))*  L0L  _))*  L0L  ZXZ

Fester

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  • El Baldito
Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2010, 04:44:45 PM »
...and with our joint massive proceeds, perhaps we could buy The Pier Pavilion Site, and build a lasting legacy?

Fester...
- Semper in Excretum, Sole Profundum Variat -



Bellringer

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Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #6 on: November 02, 2010, 05:11:15 PM »
Oh you are a pair of jokers, but I like you!!

DaveR

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Re: Consumer news and scams
« Reply #7 on: November 02, 2010, 05:28:05 PM »
"The release of The Norton Cybercrime Report coincides with the launch of Norton AntiVirus and Norton Internet Security 2011."

What an amazing coincidence!  :laugh:

Yorkie

  • Guest
WARNING
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2011, 11:15:11 AM »
The men in the plain vans with ladders on top are on the prowl again.   :o

Got a ring on the front door bell this morning to be confronted by a rather scruffy bloke with his unmarked white van parked outside and his mate sitting in the passenger seat.  "Got a load of sand and cement left from a job we just finished up the road.  Would you like your xxxxxx repointing?"

Enterprise or a scam?    Who knows?  But it is worth while keeping your wits about you and only getting work done by reputable companies who you know, or are well and worthily recommended.

DaveR

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Re: WARNING
« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2011, 01:40:19 PM »
Most likely a scam, by the sound of it. Anyone with an unmarked van should be treated with extreme caution.

Yorkie

  • Guest
Re: WARNING
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2011, 01:47:07 PM »
Makes a change from wanting to Tarmac your drive!   Or prune your trees, or fix a digital ariel, or fix a loose roof tile,or repoint your ridge, or paint your garage door, or . . . . . . . fill in your own details here.    D)

Even Boy Scouts wanting to wash your car now charge more than a Bob!       L0L

Hugo

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Re: WARNING
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2011, 03:12:09 PM »
We have signs in the street saying "no callers" and these "tradesmen" can be fined if they do call, but it doesn't seem to stop them from calling.     
It's best to turn them down and look for a reputable company like Yorkie has suggested.

Merddin Emrys

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Re: WARNING
« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2011, 03:31:59 PM »
The Penrhyn Beach estate has lots of 'no cold callers' signs everywhere yet we still get them :rage: :rage:
we had one a month after we moved in, he said ' we've had a very good response from our neighbours (in other words no one told him to b****r off) and we are in the area to do the roofs' he then handed me a leaflet. I said 'let me stop you there, you want to take the moss of my roof which causes no problem and then coat it in an entirely pointless chemical and then charge me 3 or 4 thousand pounds for the privilege',  'er well, er sort of' he said. I said it's been on Watchdog and Rogue Traders on the BBC, was it you I saw on there?' at this point he took his leaflet back and left  _))*
A pigeon is for life not just Christmas

Hugo

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Re: WARNING
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2011, 05:35:54 PM »
Three of those traders called at my house within a period of two weeks and I sent them all away but I'll stick one of those signs on the front door that CCBC supplied in their pack and hope that the cold callers will take the hint!