Author Topic: Pubs of Conwy  (Read 30888 times)

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DaveR

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #14 on: October 15, 2010, 10:42:18 AM »
Back in those days, I imagine taking the A5 through Bethesda might have been a better option?

Bellringer

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #15 on: October 15, 2010, 11:22:06 AM »
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You made a good choice in coming to live here, Stan!  :)  $wales

Yes we think so. We started by moving to live in Llandudno when my work brought me to Barclays in Mostyn St in 1983 and then in 1995 moved to where we are now on the outskirts of Conwy.

Going back to my post about staying in this area in 1964 we re-visited a couple of years later, staying in a friend's caravan on the old Morfa site (entrance over the railway bridge by the bakery). It was over an August Bank holiday weekend and the traffic queues went back past the site entrance and disappeared around the headland towards Pen. Found it best to go walking rather than driving!

DaveR

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2010, 11:26:25 AM »
Wasn't that railway bridge called Sam Parry's Bridge or am I thinking of somewhere else?  ::)

Like your new avatar pic, by the way, I hope the day comes when Holy Trinity is floodlit - would look spectacular!

Bellringer

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #17 on: October 15, 2010, 01:19:28 PM »
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Wasn't that railway bridge called Sam Parry's Bridge or am I thinking of somewhere else?  ::)

Yes I think you're right Dave and the road going down to where it was ie Bangor Rd still exists as far as Roland Young's office and yard which is where the bakery used to be.
The road into the industrial estates either side of Bangor Road near to the Expressway is called Ffordd Sam Pari. Not sure who Sam Parry was but maybe someone will tell us.

PS The avatar pic was one taken and sent to me by a Dutch visitor to the tower.

Pendragon

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #18 on: October 15, 2010, 03:38:09 PM »
Wasn't that railway bridge called Sam Parry's Bridge or am I thinking of somewhere else?

The shop (now called sunway travel) across the road from the Albion was owned by a gentleman called Mr Parry, the building was always known as Parrys Watch.  Maybe its the same Parry ?
Only hindsight has 20/20 vision
Angiegram - A romantic notion derived from the more mundane truth.

Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you; you just gotta find the ones worth suffering for." -Bob Marley

Bellringer

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #19 on: October 15, 2010, 05:07:00 PM »
I'm told that the Parry in Parry's Watch was a Mr Ivor Parry and the business was continued by his son Stanley until sometime in the 80's. The business was also a newsagents and included a china shop next door. Ivor Parry was a local councillor and a Mayor of Conwy on more than one occasion.
The source of this information ie my neighbour, has lived all his 70 odd years in Conwy and tells me that even when "he were a lad" the bridge was called Sam Parry's bridge, but he never knew why.

BTW DaveR - I wonder whether you could maybe re-produce the list of Conwy traders which I sent you a while back and which appeared on the old forum. If you do not have it I think I still have a copy.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2010, 05:08:40 PM by Bellringer »

Pendragon

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #20 on: October 15, 2010, 06:48:46 PM »
Erm ..................So it wasn't him then lol :D
Only hindsight has 20/20 vision
Angiegram - A romantic notion derived from the more mundane truth.

Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you; you just gotta find the ones worth suffering for." -Bob Marley



DaveR

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #21 on: January 14, 2011, 06:16:27 PM »
This one's for you, Pendragon. Not sure of the year, anytime from 1900 -1920s, judging by the guide to Conwy I found it in?

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Pendragon

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #22 on: January 15, 2011, 01:08:07 PM »
Cheers Dave, I walk past it everyday and it breaks my heart that a fantastic heritage pub like that has been left closed. I was told the other day it was offered someone for 160,000, you can't buy a house within the walls for that!  It annoys me that no one sees the potential in it. Its an absolute Jem. blah blah blah (save yr breathe Parry)  >>>
Only hindsight has 20/20 vision
Angiegram - A romantic notion derived from the more mundane truth.

Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you; you just gotta find the ones worth suffering for." -Bob Marley

DaveR

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #23 on: February 14, 2011, 08:43:25 PM »
Just a slight addition to the list....The Black Horse inn (In existence in 1795) - I've found out that it was on the West side of Castle Street - the building immediately to left of Aberconwy house.

Pendragon

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #24 on: February 14, 2011, 10:46:09 PM »
This is the oldest photo of aberconwy house I could find in my albums. I don't know what year it was though.

Only hindsight has 20/20 vision
Angiegram - A romantic notion derived from the more mundane truth.

Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you; you just gotta find the ones worth suffering for." -Bob Marley

Pendragon

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #25 on: February 17, 2011, 09:03:59 PM »
A photo of the "White Horse" the landlord was John Williams in 1886.  This photo is proof the Albion was indeed at one time two pubs, as the landlord of the Albion in 1886 was called Humphrey Griffiths.  If you look at the photo of the Albion in an earlier post on this thread you can clearly see where the sign for the "White Horse" was situated between the windows.  The original picture is in a bad way.  I do apologise for the condition.
Only hindsight has 20/20 vision
Angiegram - A romantic notion derived from the more mundane truth.

Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you; you just gotta find the ones worth suffering for." -Bob Marley

Pendragon

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #26 on: February 17, 2011, 09:11:53 PM »
These are pictures of "The Sun." the first a pencil drawing dated 1831.  The second is a painting commissioned by Robs family at a later date.  Notice how the artist has used artistic licence to straighten the sloping roof at the rear and added a window.  Apparently the Sun was a kind of Almshouse at the time for people who found themselves destitute.

 ))* forgot to put the first picture in so they are the wrong way round.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2011, 09:14:13 PM by Pendragon »
Only hindsight has 20/20 vision
Angiegram - A romantic notion derived from the more mundane truth.

Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you; you just gotta find the ones worth suffering for." -Bob Marley

Trojan

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #27 on: February 18, 2011, 05:49:20 AM »
 *&(

DaveR

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #28 on: February 18, 2011, 08:55:27 AM »
I've copied Angie's list of Conwy pubs over to this thread. Will have try and reconcile the two lists to produce a definitive list at some point!


it suddenly dawned on me that a gentleman I had met through the Albion called Rob Pritchard was a mine of information on such subjects. 
As soon as I got home I phoned him and arranged to meet him at his house.  When I arrived he had dug out old papers and photos of Conwy.  He had misheard me on the phone and thought I wanted to research old pubs of Conwy.  I was amazed to find he had lists and photos and other related paraphernalia regarding the subject.  He has loaned me old exerts from papers and journals.  I am going to write at length on the subject tomorrow but due to my lad wanting my dongle in an hour  I will give you a taster now.  I'm sorry this is a rushed job but I was so excited.  I know you'll love it.

Here's a list of all the pubs in Conwy through the 1800s until the present day:  Some of them could have been the same place with a change in name.  Until I go through all these papers I couldn't tell you at present.  I've even got the list of all the proprietors but not enough time to write them in now.

The Anchor ............Uppergate Street
The Albion .............Uppergate Street
The White Horse.....Uppergate Street
The Union...............Church Street
The Swan...............Berry Street
The Soldiers Arms...Berry Street
The Ship.................Castle Street
The Ship.................High Street (there was two)
The Royal Oak........Quay
The Rising Gull.......Berry Street
The Red Lion..........High Street
The Railway Tavern..Lancaster square
The Plough.............Lancaster square
The Newborough later called The Harp (which I have a photo of) on High Street
The New Inn............
The Mail Coach.......High Street
The Liverpool Arms...Quay
The King's Head.......High Street
The Joiners Arms......Quay
The George and Dragon...Castle Street
The Foresters Arms...Gyffin
The Feathers...........Bangor Road
The Erskine (Malt Loaf)..Rosehill Street
The Eccles Inn....
The Eagles.............Castle Street
The Crown...........High Street
The Conwy Castle...No 3 Berry Street
The Coach and Horses....High Street
The Castle View.......The old co op (bangor road)
The Castle Hotel (Castle Inn)...High Street
The Carpenters Arms...No6 Berry Street
The Bulls Head....High Street
The Britannia...Castle Street
The Bridge.......Rosehill Street
The Blue Bell.....Castle Street
The Black Horse...Castle Street
The Black Lion......Castle Street
The Boot Inn.........Lancaser Square.

I have written below some interesting excerpts from the old papers:

The Kings Head was a farmers house.  In it's back garden was a cock pit which was used at times, as old inhabitants tell, by gypsies to settle their quarrels with the fists.  From the little stone building at the end of the garden spectators watched both cocks and gypsies in combat.  (it doesn't say what year)
                                  .........................................................................................
Edward Williams late "Black Lion" Conwy fell from a tree 21st Feby 1851 died Sunday night about 10 o'clock 23 Feby 1821.  Buried 27th he was born in the year 1792.
                                  .........................................................................................