Author Topic: Pubs of Conwy  (Read 30888 times)

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Pendragon

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #29 on: February 18, 2011, 10:05:08 AM »
In the above post it mentions the Kings Head as a farmers house with a cock pit at the back.  At first I thought this pub would be situated on Bangor Road mainly because of the "cock pit".  It was actually situated next door to the Castle Inn on high street.  The Castle Hotel on the High Street in Conwy was at one time the site of both these pubs with the "cock pit" out the back.  The reason The Kings Head was referred to as a farmers house was because this was the common pub where farm labourers and fishermen would drink while The Castle Inn was for the more affluent in Conwy's society.
Only hindsight has 20/20 vision
Angiegram - A romantic notion derived from the more mundane truth.

Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you; you just gotta find the ones worth suffering for." -Bob Marley

DaveR

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #30 on: February 18, 2011, 12:16:29 PM »
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The Castle Inn was for the more affluent in Conwy's society.
Not much has changed!  ;D

Trojan

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #31 on: February 18, 2011, 07:48:52 PM »
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The Castle Inn was for the more affluent in Conwy's society.
Not much has changed!  ;D

 :)

DaveR

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #32 on: February 18, 2011, 10:00:34 PM »
Ok, I've merged my list with Angie's list and this is the result a total of 51 pubs! Although, I suspect one or two may be duplicates...

Why were there so many Pubs in Conwy?

1) Busy port - Fishing Boats & Timber Ships
2) Navvies working on bridges, railway and cob
3) Miners from the lead mines in the countryside nearby
4) Conwy on Post route from Ireland to London

Conwy's pubs, past and present, vanished and in other uses
(those marked * are still running as pubs today):


The Albion Vaults* (6 Uppergate Street)
The Anchor  Uppergate Street (Could be same as Crown & Anchor or Hope & Anchor possibly?)
The Black Horse (West side of Castle Street - immediately to left of Aberconwy house) (In existence in 1795)
The Black Lion (Lyon) (now semi-derelict, Castle Street) (In existence in 1795) (Landlord 1895 - David Roberts)
The Blue Bell* (Castle Street) (Landlord in 1856 - Edward Jones)
The Boot Inn (now r/h side of Alfredos, Lancaster Square) (In existence in 1795) (William Lardner - Landlord in 1798)
The Bull (distinct from the Bull's Head, no idea as to location - any ideas?) (In existence in 1795)
The Bull's Head (High Street, by present Bull Cottages)
The Bridge* (Rosehill Street)
The Britannia Castle Street (Chinese Takeaway opposite NatWest Bank)
The Carpenters Arms (No 6 Berry Street)
The Castle Inn/Hotel* (High Street)(Landlady 1856 - Cordelia Owen)
The Castle View (Bangor Road, Old Co-op Building))
The Cockpit (in vicinity of the Cockpit)
The Commercial Inn Mrs Jane Fielding Llanrwst Rd Gyffin (1929)
The Conway Castle (No. 3 Berry Street) (Thomas Jones - Landlord in 1798)
The Conway [Conwy] Ferry (1798)(Landlady - Mary Davies)
The Conway [Conwy] Mariner (In existence in 1795)(Landlord - Thomas Jones)
The Crown and Anchor, Conwy (Landlord - John Jones)
The Crown Vaults Tavern (High Street, same side as Plas Mawr - Edwards Butchers Shop site?) (Miss Mary Annie Davies - Landlady 1910)
The Cross Keys, Conwy (In existence in 1903)
The Eagles Inn (Now Fisherman's Chip Shop, Castle Street) (In existence in 1795)
The Eccles Inn (Could this be a misspelling of Eagles Inn?)
The Feathers (7 Lancaster Square - currently the Post Office) (Richard Lewis - Landlord in 1798)
The Foresters Arms (Gyffin, now a private house)
The George & Dragon* (21 Castle Street)(Formerly the Tal Y Cafn)
The Hall, Conwy (Landlord - John Thomas)
The Harp Hotel (High Street, where Spar (former Woolworths) is now) (Roger Rous - Landlord in 1798)(formerly The Newborough)
The Hope and Anchor, Conwy (Landlord - Robert Jones)   
The Joiners Arms (other side of Wing Gate Wall)(now house called Glanrafon)
The Kings Head (now l/h side of Castle Hotel)(Later known as Castle Vaults)
The Liverpool Arms* (on the Quay)
The Mail Coach/Coach & Horses* (High Street)
The Malt Loaf/Erskine Arms Hotel* (Rosehill Street) (Erskine Refreshment Room - on current car park)(Erskine Tap Room - Church Street)
The Mostyn Arms - Castle Street
The New Inn
The Newbridge Arms (Newborough Terrace)
The Old Bull's Head (High Street, in area where Bull Cottages are now)
The Pen y Grisia, Conway [Conwy] (1798)(Landlady - Catherine Jones)
The Plough Inn (site now occupied by Beresford Adams, Lancaster Square)
The Plough Bach (to left of Plough Inn (above))
The Railway Tavern, No.1 York Place, Conwy
The Red Lion (Lyon) (on High Street, opposite Conwy Pantry) (In existence in 1795)
The Rising Gull (Berry Street)
The Royal Oak Tavern (house to right of 'Smallest House' on Quay)
The Ship Tavern (now Pen Y Bryn Tearooms, High Street) (In existence in 1795)
The Ship (Castle Street)(next to the Eagles)
The Soldiers Rest (by Berry Street Arch) (May also have been called Soldiers Arms)
The Sun, Conway (In existence in 1795 - Mary Jones Landlady)
The Swan (Berry Street, 'up entry by old Co-op')
The Union Tavern (Chapel Street - now Hen Dafarn house?)
The White Horse (Uppergate Street - next to the Albion)
The White Lion, Conwy (Landlord - Nathaniel Atkinson)
« Last Edit: February 20, 2011, 08:01:07 AM by DaveR »

DaveR

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #33 on: February 18, 2011, 10:14:01 PM »
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In the above post it mentions the Kings Head as a farmers house with a cock pit at the back.  At first I thought this pub would be situated on Bangor Road mainly because of the "cock pit".  It was actually situated next door to the Castle Inn on high street.  The Castle Hotel on the High Street in Conwy was at one time the site of both these pubs with the "cock pit" out the back.  The reason The Kings Head was referred to as a farmers house was because this was the common pub where farm labourers and fishermen would drink while The Castle Inn was for the more affluent in Conwy's society.
The Kings Head:

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DaveR

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #34 on: February 18, 2011, 10:26:15 PM »
The Albion in 2010:

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DaveR

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #35 on: February 19, 2011, 10:32:02 AM »
It seems that times are not good for pubs called 'Albion'. The one in Llanrwst is up for sale at just £120,000 - a great position on the square and a large building. You can see it in this pic, the stone faced building on the left:

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"ALBION, LLANRWST North Wales Snowdonia National Park Town
Centre Pub. Open plan split level trade bar with lounge and
games area. Four bedroom owners accommodation. Trade garden.
Freehold Offers around £120,000 (33059)"



DaveR

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #36 on: February 19, 2011, 07:19:09 PM »
Advert for the Harp Hotel/Pub on Castle Street, Conwy, Now the site of the Spar (former Woolworths):

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DaveR

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #37 on: February 19, 2011, 07:51:25 PM »
Angie has passed to me a lot of information about old Conwy, which I am in the process of digitising. Here is an article about the Castle Hotel, High Street that has been scanned from the original document and then read using OCR:

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The Castle Hotel at Conway, twenty—odd miles from Denbigh, like its namesake at Ruthin,
is a combination of two old inns: the Castle, which doubtless had another name in its
early days, and the King's Head. Both show a modern front to the street, a construction
of 1885, but behind this there is, in the case of the humbler King's Head, much heavy
oak timberwork of the earlier l500s at least, and in the case of the Castle, a coaching
inn of the later period, with subsequent modernizations. But the oldest part of all is
in the big stableyard at the back where portions of the wall dividing the inn premises
from the churchyard are believed to be the remains of a twelfth—century Cistercian
Abbey upon part of the site of which the inn was first built.

The two inns were of very different character. The King's Head was a farmers' house.
In its back garden was a Cock Pit which was used at times, as old inhabitants tell, by
gypsies to settle their quarrels with the fists. From the little stone building at the
end of the garden spectators watched both cocks and gypsies in combat.
The Castle was the house of the "quality", the "Head Inn" of Aberconway as it used to
be called. Here the reception was held to George Stevenson to celebrate the opening of
his Tubular Bridge across the Conway river in 1848, and here the coaches stopped to
change horses in the stableyard.

There is a rare survival of those days to be seen in one of the existing stable build-
ings. It is now used as a coal store, just inside the door to the left is a small recess
or cupboard. An old customer of the King's Head who worked in the stableyard as a boy
over fifty years ago says that he was told by old men at that time that this cupboard
was originally closed by an iron door, and in it Mail Coach drivers looked up their
time bills, countersigned by the postmaster who supplied the change of horses, certifying
the time of arrival and departure of each coach.

It is possible that more than is realized of these old stable buildings is of monastic
masonry. The Abbey was removed nearly 700 years ago when Conway castle was built and the
town fortified by the walls that still surround it, for Conway is one of the few walled
towns left. Later there was on its site a building known as the "Spital," probably a
mediaeval Guest House, and out of that the first inn may have developed. Old foundations
have been found here from time to time, skeletons, a tombstone and a font to suggest
tales of the Castle's very long ago past.

In more modern times the house has acquired a reputation for its large collection of
old Welsh furniture, and for the mural paintings, mostly of Shakespearian scenes done
towards the end of the last century by two well—known artists, Dawson Watson and
Bernard Ousey. A much older painting was discovered in the inn some sixty years ago.
Dirty and neglected, eventually it was cleaned and proved to be a portrait inscribed
"Dame Penderel l662." Dame Penderel was the mother of the two brothers who hid the
fugitive King Charles II in the oak tree at Boscobel, and the picture, it was discovered,
had been given to a former owner of the Castle by two old ladies, connected with the
Penderel family, who lived not far from Boscobel. A photograph of the portrait hangs in
the lounge, the original is now in the town museum, close by.

( "Tales of Old Inns, by Richard Keverne. pub: Collins. 1959. pages 162 — l64.)
" Owen’s Castle Inn Conway was sold up in November 1841"
" Edward son of Merydith nailor was married to the old Servant Maid
Castle Inn Conway Octr 23/52."
(Extracts from Chronicle of Events by Thomas Roberts,postmaster of Conway.)
« Last Edit: February 20, 2011, 08:14:19 AM by DaveR »

Pendragon

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #38 on: February 27, 2011, 04:31:41 PM »
I went to St Benedicts Church today in Gyffin.  The parish church of Gyffin, dedicated to St Benedict. This is a small church on an ancient site. The earliest part of the building is 12th century. Bishop Richard Davies, translator of the Bible, was baptised here in the 16c.
The entrance to the church is clearly very old.  I had a good look round, there's some very old graves here too. I noticed a few old landlords from the 1800s are buried here. I'll make arrangements to meet the vicar sometime this week and see if I can uncover more. On the old church door I could see an inscription from the 1600s. graffiti was "in" then too.  :o
Only hindsight has 20/20 vision
Angiegram - A romantic notion derived from the more mundane truth.

Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you; you just gotta find the ones worth suffering for." -Bob Marley

Pendragon

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #39 on: February 27, 2011, 04:41:19 PM »
John Williams was the landlord of the White Horse (next door to the Albion) On February 8th 1868 his wife Ann died aged 56.  John Williams then married a lady called Elizabeth who died 3 years later aged 44 in 1871. Both graves are in St Benedict's. John Williams was a bit of a ladies man then? 
Only hindsight has 20/20 vision
Angiegram - A romantic notion derived from the more mundane truth.

Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you; you just gotta find the ones worth suffering for." -Bob Marley

Trojan

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #40 on: February 28, 2011, 05:19:52 PM »
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I went to St Benedicts Church today in Gyffin.  The parish church of Gyffin, dedicated to St Benedict.

 *&(

 8)

Pendragon

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #41 on: March 24, 2011, 01:02:33 PM »
Some futher information reguarding the pubs of Conwy.  Again all researched by Rob Pritchard and his late father.

Notes on individual Pubs of Conwy.

Albion –  6 Uppergate Street

P D C    1886  Humphrey Griffith
S T D    1886  Edward Roberts

Black lion – Next door to Blue Bell

S D N W 1856  David Roberts
P D C      1886  Thomas Jones
S T D      1886  Thomas Jones

Mr Goodall of the Black Lion Conwy was buried 28th May 1850.

Edward Williams late of the Black Lion Conwy fell from a tree 21st feb 1851.  He died Sunday night about 10pm.
23rd Feb 1851. Buried on the 27th – he was born 1792.

Black Horse – Castle Street – Veals bakery

S D N W  1856  Thomas Roberts
P D C       1886  Robert Pritchard
S T D       1886  Elizabeth Owen

Charles Roberts son of the Black Horse died Dec 19th 1837
John Roberts late of the Old Black Horse died in London 19th june 1843


Boot Inn – Lancaster Square – Alfredos

S D N W  1856  Thomas Evans
P D C       1886  William Davies
S T D       1886  William Davies

S P D  1886  Sarah Dutton
S T D  1886  Sarah Dutton

Bridge – Castle Street

Blue Bell – Castle Street

S D N W  1856  Edward Jones
S P D C   1886  John Smallwood
S T D      1886  John Trevor

Edward Jones Blue Bell was married to Catherine Lardner of the Boot, Conwy on Sunday Jan 25th 1825.
Elizabeth Jones daughter of Elizabeth Jones Blue Bell Conwy buried 14th Sept 1843.



Britannia – Castle Street – (Bob Parry Bookmakers.)

Bulls Head – High Street – (Bull Cotages)

Castle View – Rosehill Street – (Old Co-Op)

P D C  1886  Abram Thomas
S T D  1886  Thomas Abram

Coach and Horses – High Street

S D N W  1856  Owen Williams


Castle Hotel – Also Castle Inn – High Street

S D N W  1856  Cordelia Owen

Conwy Castle – No 3 Berry Street

S D N W  1856  John Jones

The Feathers – Bangor Road – (Sunway Travel)


Foresters Arms – Arfon Tee Gyffin

P D C  1886  John Hughes

Carpenters Arms – No6 Berry Street

Crown – High Street – ( Barclays Bank)

S D N W  1856  Hugh Jones
P D C       1886  Elizabeth Davies
S T D       1886  Elizabeth Davies

Eccles Inn - ? (by the looks of it, I think the Eccles is a spelling mistake)

P D C     1886  Humphrey Williams

Eagles – Castle Street – (Milk Bar)

S T D      1886  Humphrey Williams

Erskine Arms Hotel – Rose Hill Street –(Malt Loaf)

S D N W  1856  Richard Williams
B D C       1886  R T Roberts

Also Reskine refreshment room – now car park opposite Malt Loaf

Erskine Tap Room – Church Street

George an Dragon – Castle Street – (formerly Tal Y Cafn)

S D N W   1856  Richard Wyche
P D C        1886  Margaret Jones
S T D        1886  John Smallwood



Harp Inn – High Street – (Formerly The Newborough) (Was Woolworths now Spar and Chatterbox)

S D N W 1856  Catherine Edwards (The Newbourough Arms)
P D C      1886  Jane Williams
S T C       1886  Jane and Ellen Williams

Joiners Arms – Glan Rafon – The Quay

S D N W   1856  Robert Jones

Mail Coach – High street

S D N W   1856  Robert Davies
P D C        1886  Jane Evans
S T D        1886  Catherine Thomas

New Inn - ?

Newborough Arms – The Harp

Kings Head – Later Castle Vaults - High Street – Next to Castle Hotel

S T D     1886  John Ellis

Liverpool Arms – The Quay

P D C    1886  Catherine Roberts
S T D    1886  William Thomas

Mostyn Arms – Castle Street

Union – Chapel Street – (opposite Seion Chapel Schoolroom)





Royal Oak – The Quay

S D N W     1856  J Roberts
P D C          1886  Robert Roberts
S D N W   1856   Robert Roberts

The Ship – Castle Street (next to the Eagles)

Soldiers o – Between Bury Street and Joiners Arms

The Ship – High Street

Railway Tavern – Lancaster Square – No1 York Place

S D N W   1856  Thomas Jones
P D C        1886  Elizabeth Duncombe
S T D        1886  Elizabeth Duncombe

Red Lion – High Street – 1st block rt hand side (sign on door)

P D C    1886  David Jones
S T D    1886  Evan Evans

Rising Gull – Berry Street – opposite old Co Op

Plough Lancaster Square – (Corner Cafι, down steps under Indian Restaurant)

P D C   1886  Catherine Williams

Swan – Berry Street – Up entry by the old Co-op

White Horse – Uppergate Street – Next door to the Albion

S D N W     1856  Hugh Foulks
S T D           1886  John Williams


Reasons for the large number of pubs

1.   Busy Port – Fishing and Timber Ships
2.   Navvies working on bridges on cob
3.   Miners from the lead mines
4.   Conwy on the postal route to and from Holyhead.

Retailers of Beer 1856

Hugh Hughes – Lancaster Square
William Hughes – High Street
Robert Jones – Lancaster Square
John Roberts – High Street
William Roberts – Castle Street
Elizabeth Thomas – castle Street

Sources

Slaters Directory of North Wales 1856 (SDNW)
Postal Directory of Caerns 1886 (PDC)
Slaters Trade directory 1886 (STD)


Only hindsight has 20/20 vision
Angiegram - A romantic notion derived from the more mundane truth.

Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you; you just gotta find the ones worth suffering for." -Bob Marley

suepp

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #42 on: March 24, 2011, 07:24:46 PM »

Reasons for the large number of pubs

1.   Busy Port – Fishing and Timber Ships
2.   Navvies working on bridges on cob
3.   Miners from the lead mines
4.   Conwy on the postal route to and from Holyhead.

It was safer to drink beer than water! Z**

Pendragon

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Re: Pubs of Conwy
« Reply #43 on: April 09, 2011, 10:42:20 AM »
An advert for The Castle Hotel in Conwy.  Haven't things changed, now pubs advertise 3D Sky Sports on big screens whereas in those days they boast the fact they had ElectricLight.
Only hindsight has 20/20 vision
Angiegram - A romantic notion derived from the more mundane truth.

Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you; you just gotta find the ones worth suffering for." -Bob Marley