Three Towns Forum - Talk about Llandudno, Colwyn Bay & Conwy

The Local => Times Past => Topic started by: DaveR on September 12, 2010, 10:18:34 PM

Title: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on September 12, 2010, 10:18:34 PM
This originally appeared on my blog:

I thought I would compile a list of Conwy's pubs, past and present, vanished and in other uses, (around 30 in total, I believe) as I can't find one on the Internet (those marked * are still running as pubs today):

The Albion Vaults* (6 Uppergate Street)
The Anchor  Uppergate Street (Could be same as Crown & Anchor or Hope & Anchor possibly?)
The Black Horse (West side of Castle Street - immediately to left of Aberconwy house) (In existence in 1795)
The Black Lion (Lyon) (now semi-derelict, Castle Street) (In existence in 1795)
The Blue Bell* (Castle Street)
The Boot Inn (now r/h side of Alfredos, Lancaster Square) (In existence in 1795) (William Lardner - Landlord in 1798)
The Bull (distinct from the Bull's Head, no idea as to location - any ideas?) (In existence in 1795)
The Bridge* (Rosehill Street)
The Britannia Castle Street
The Carpenters Arms (No 6 Berry Street)
The Castle Inn/Hotel* (High Street)
The Castle View (Bangor Road, Old Co-op Building))
The Cockpit (in vicinity of the Cockpit)
The Commercial Inn Mrs Jane Fielding Llanrwst Rd Gyffin (1929)
The Conway Castle (No. 3 Berry Street) (Thomas Jones - Landlord in 1798)
The Conway [Conwy] Ferry (1798)(Landlady - Mary Davies)
The Conway [Conwy] Mariner (In existence in 1795)(Landlord - Thomas Jones)
The Crown and Anchor, Conwy (Landlord - John Jones)
The Crown Vaults Tavern (High Street, same side as Plas Mawr) (Miss Mary Annie Davies - Landlady 1910)
The Cross Keys, Conwy (In existence in 1903)
The Eagles Inn (Now Fisherman's Chip Shop, Castle Street) (In existence in 1795)
The Eccles Inn (Could this be a misspelling of Eagles Inn?)
The Feathers (Bangor Road) (Richard Lewis - Landlord in 1798)
The Foresters Arms (Gyffin, now a private house)
The George & Dragon* (21 Castle Street)
The Hall, Conwy (Landlord - John Thomas)
The Harp Hotel (High Street, where Spar (former Woolworths) is now) (Roger Rous - Landlord in 1798)(formerly The Newborough)
The Hope and Anchor, Conwy (Landlord - Robert Jones)   
The Joiners Arms (other side of Wing Gate Wall)
The Kings Head (now l/h side of Castle Hotel)
The Liverpool Arms* (on the Quay)
The Mail Coach/Coach & Horses* (High Street)
The Malt Loaf/Erskine Arms Hotel* (Rosehill Street)
The New Inn
The Newbridge Arms (Newborough Terrace)
The Old Bull's Head (High Street, in area where Bull Cottages are now)
The Pen y Grisia, Conway [Conwy] (1798)(Landlady - Catherine Jones)
The Plough Inn (site now occupied by Beresford Adams, Lancaster Square)
The Plough Bach (to left of Plough Inn (above))
The Railway Tavern, York Place, Conwy
The Red Lion (Lyon) (on High Street, opposite Conwy Pantry) (In existence in 1795)
The Rising Gull (Berry Street)
The Royal Oak Tavern (house to right of 'Smallest House' on Quay)
The Ship Tavern (now Pen Y Bryn Tearooms, High Street) (In existence in 1795)
The Ship (Castle Street)
The Soldiers Rest (by Berry Street Arch) (May also have been called Soldiers Arms)
The Sun, Conway (In existence in 1795 - Mary Jones Landlady)
The Swan (Berry Street, now Swan Cottage B&B)
The Union Tavern (Church Street)
The White Horse (Uppergate Street)
The White Lion, Conwy (Landlord - Nathaniel Atkinson)

I've complied a list from various sources, including Gwynedd Archives, but any mistakes are mine. If you spot any errors or have information/anecdotes/a photo to add, please do so.

Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: suepp on September 12, 2010, 10:54:33 PM
Commercial Inn Mrs Jane Fielding Llanrwst Rd Gyffin (1929)
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Barbiroli on September 12, 2010, 11:24:36 PM
The Albion Vaults is now closed.
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on September 13, 2010, 09:32:42 AM
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Commercial Inn Mrs Jane Fielding Llanrwst Rd Gyffin (1929)
Thanks, Sue, I shall add it into the list.  :)  Do you know whereabouts it was?
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on September 13, 2010, 09:41:03 AM
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The Albion Vaults is now closed.
That's a shame but not that much of a surprise, I suppose.  :(
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: suepp on September 13, 2010, 10:24:59 AM
The entry before the Commercial Inn is "Cae Cregin, here is a public footpath - return" then the Commercial Inn, Conway and Penmaenmawr Joint Hospital for Infectious Diseases, Baclaw Farm and Here  is a lane leading to Henryd. The Foresters is not listed on the Llanrwst road entries. 
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on October 08, 2010, 10:05:56 PM
Found this photo of The Albion that i took back in 2005:
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Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on October 13, 2010, 06:40:25 PM
Pendragon has kindly donated this photo of the original Albion Vaults, which i think was taken in the 1880s:

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&well&
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Bellringer on October 13, 2010, 06:56:50 PM
Perhaps I am missing it in your list Dave but there used to be a pub on the old A55 near to where the Penmaenbach tunnel entrance now is. I remember a visit to the area in 1964 and calling there for a drink - I thought that was called The Ship.
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Trojan on October 13, 2010, 09:53:06 PM
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Perhaps I am missing it in your list Dave but there used to be a pub on the old A55 near to where the Penmaenbach tunnel entrance now is. I remember a visit to the area in 1964 and calling there for a drink - I thought that was called The Ship.

The Old White house?

http://www.oldwhitehouseconwy.com/ (http://www.oldwhitehouseconwy.com/)
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on October 13, 2010, 09:58:16 PM
No, the Ship was demolished in 1986 and was just before where the present Penmaenbach tunnel entrance is now, here's a pic:

Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Bellringer on October 13, 2010, 10:25:36 PM
Yes that's the one Dave. We started the week of our honeymoon in the area with a drink there and finished the week with a meal in Alfredo's - that was end of March/early April 1964. And now living less than a mile away!! Funny how things work out isn't it?
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on October 14, 2010, 09:17:06 PM
You made a good choice in coming to live here, Stan!  :)  $wales
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: ormegolf on October 14, 2010, 09:29:51 PM
I suppose that if I added the time together I have spent HOURS outside this pub.  Why outside, you may ask? Because I could'nt get inside, I was driving a car. Sunday teatime in particular, all traffic travelling towards Conwy would be at a standstill. Dont you youngsters think traffic james are a new invention. Before the Conwy tunnel, before the "new" Arrol Bridge, back to Telfords suspension bridge as the only road across (God, how old am I?)  this Pub was often the start of the queue.
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Quiggs on October 15, 2010, 12:12:19 AM
When I travelled this road, the queue started in Penmaenmawr, at the hight of the summer season sometimes as far as Llanfairfechan. We used to go over the Sychnant pass down into Gyffin to avoid the queue. Trouble was every local had the same idea. :(
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on October 15, 2010, 10:42:18 AM
Back in those days, I imagine taking the A5 through Bethesda might have been a better option?
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Bellringer on October 15, 2010, 11:22:06 AM
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You made a good choice in coming to live here, Stan!  :)  $wales

Yes we think so. We started by moving to live in Llandudno when my work brought me to Barclays in Mostyn St in 1983 and then in 1995 moved to where we are now on the outskirts of Conwy.

Going back to my post about staying in this area in 1964 we re-visited a couple of years later, staying in a friend's caravan on the old Morfa site (entrance over the railway bridge by the bakery). It was over an August Bank holiday weekend and the traffic queues went back past the site entrance and disappeared around the headland towards Pen. Found it best to go walking rather than driving!
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on October 15, 2010, 11:26:25 AM
Wasn't that railway bridge called Sam Parry's Bridge or am I thinking of somewhere else?  ::)

Like your new avatar pic, by the way, I hope the day comes when Holy Trinity is floodlit - would look spectacular!
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Bellringer on October 15, 2010, 01:19:28 PM
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Wasn't that railway bridge called Sam Parry's Bridge or am I thinking of somewhere else?  ::)

Yes I think you're right Dave and the road going down to where it was ie Bangor Rd still exists as far as Roland Young's office and yard which is where the bakery used to be.
The road into the industrial estates either side of Bangor Road near to the Expressway is called Ffordd Sam Pari. Not sure who Sam Parry was but maybe someone will tell us.

PS The avatar pic was one taken and sent to me by a Dutch visitor to the tower.
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on October 15, 2010, 03:38:09 PM
Wasn't that railway bridge called Sam Parry's Bridge or am I thinking of somewhere else?

The shop (now called sunway travel) across the road from the Albion was owned by a gentleman called Mr Parry, the building was always known as Parrys Watch.  Maybe its the same Parry ?
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Bellringer on October 15, 2010, 05:07:00 PM
I'm told that the Parry in Parry's Watch was a Mr Ivor Parry and the business was continued by his son Stanley until sometime in the 80's. The business was also a newsagents and included a china shop next door. Ivor Parry was a local councillor and a Mayor of Conwy on more than one occasion.
The source of this information ie my neighbour, has lived all his 70 odd years in Conwy and tells me that even when "he were a lad" the bridge was called Sam Parry's bridge, but he never knew why.

BTW DaveR - I wonder whether you could maybe re-produce the list of Conwy traders which I sent you a while back and which appeared on the old forum. If you do not have it I think I still have a copy.
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on October 15, 2010, 06:48:46 PM
Erm ..................So it wasn't him then lol :D
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on January 14, 2011, 06:16:27 PM
This one's for you, Pendragon. Not sure of the year, anytime from 1900 -1920s, judging by the guide to Conwy I found it in?

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Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on January 15, 2011, 01:08:07 PM
Cheers Dave, I walk past it everyday and it breaks my heart that a fantastic heritage pub like that has been left closed. I was told the other day it was offered someone for £160,000, you can't buy a house within the walls for that!  It annoys me that no one sees the potential in it. Its an absolute Jem. blah blah blah (save yr breathe Parry)  >>>
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on February 14, 2011, 08:43:25 PM
Just a slight addition to the list....The Black Horse inn (In existence in 1795) - I've found out that it was on the West side of Castle Street - the building immediately to left of Aberconwy house.
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on February 14, 2011, 10:46:09 PM
This is the oldest photo of aberconwy house I could find in my albums. I don't know what year it was though.

Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on February 17, 2011, 09:03:59 PM
A photo of the "White Horse" the landlord was John Williams in 1886.  This photo is proof the Albion was indeed at one time two pubs, as the landlord of the Albion in 1886 was called Humphrey Griffiths.  If you look at the photo of the Albion in an earlier post on this thread you can clearly see where the sign for the "White Horse" was situated between the windows.  The original picture is in a bad way.  I do apologise for the condition.
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on February 17, 2011, 09:11:53 PM
These are pictures of "The Sun." the first a pencil drawing dated 1831.  The second is a painting commissioned by Robs family at a later date.  Notice how the artist has used artistic licence to straighten the sloping roof at the rear and added a window.  Apparently the Sun was a kind of Almshouse at the time for people who found themselves destitute.

 ))* forgot to put the first picture in so they are the wrong way round.
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Trojan on February 18, 2011, 05:49:20 AM
 *&(
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on February 18, 2011, 08:55:27 AM
I've copied Angie's list of Conwy pubs over to this thread. Will have try and reconcile the two lists to produce a definitive list at some point!


it suddenly dawned on me that a gentleman I had met through the Albion called Rob Pritchard was a mine of information on such subjects. 
As soon as I got home I phoned him and arranged to meet him at his house.  When I arrived he had dug out old papers and photos of Conwy.  He had misheard me on the phone and thought I wanted to research old pubs of Conwy.  I was amazed to find he had lists and photos and other related paraphernalia regarding the subject.  He has loaned me old exerts from papers and journals.  I am going to write at length on the subject tomorrow but due to my lad wanting my dongle in an hour  I will give you a taster now.  I'm sorry this is a rushed job but I was so excited.  I know you'll love it.

Here's a list of all the pubs in Conwy through the 1800s until the present day:  Some of them could have been the same place with a change in name.  Until I go through all these papers I couldn't tell you at present.  I've even got the list of all the proprietors but not enough time to write them in now.

The Anchor ............Uppergate Street
The Albion .............Uppergate Street
The White Horse.....Uppergate Street
The Union...............Church Street
The Swan...............Berry Street
The Soldiers Arms...Berry Street
The Ship.................Castle Street
The Ship.................High Street (there was two)
The Royal Oak........Quay
The Rising Gull.......Berry Street
The Red Lion..........High Street
The Railway Tavern..Lancaster square
The Plough.............Lancaster square
The Newborough later called The Harp (which I have a photo of) on High Street
The New Inn............
The Mail Coach.......High Street
The Liverpool Arms...Quay
The King's Head.......High Street
The Joiners Arms......Quay
The George and Dragon...Castle Street
The Foresters Arms...Gyffin
The Feathers...........Bangor Road
The Erskine (Malt Loaf)..Rosehill Street
The Eccles Inn....
The Eagles.............Castle Street
The Crown...........High Street
The Conwy Castle...No 3 Berry Street
The Coach and Horses....High Street
The Castle View.......The old co op (bangor road)
The Castle Hotel (Castle Inn)...High Street
The Carpenters Arms...No6 Berry Street
The Bulls Head....High Street
The Britannia...Castle Street
The Bridge.......Rosehill Street
The Blue Bell.....Castle Street
The Black Horse...Castle Street
The Black Lion......Castle Street
The Boot Inn.........Lancaser Square.

I have written below some interesting excerpts from the old papers:

The Kings Head was a farmers house.  In it's back garden was a cock pit which was used at times, as old inhabitants tell, by gypsies to settle their quarrels with the fists.  From the little stone building at the end of the garden spectators watched both cocks and gypsies in combat.  (it doesn't say what year)
                                  .........................................................................................
Edward Williams late "Black Lion" Conwy fell from a tree 21st Feby 1851 died Sunday night about 10 o'clock 23 Feby 1821.  Buried 27th he was born in the year 1792.
                                  .........................................................................................
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on February 18, 2011, 10:05:08 AM
In the above post it mentions the Kings Head as a farmers house with a cock pit at the back.  At first I thought this pub would be situated on Bangor Road mainly because of the "cock pit".  It was actually situated next door to the Castle Inn on high street.  The Castle Hotel on the High Street in Conwy was at one time the site of both these pubs with the "cock pit" out the back.  The reason The Kings Head was referred to as a farmers house was because this was the common pub where farm labourers and fishermen would drink while The Castle Inn was for the more affluent in Conwy's society.
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on February 18, 2011, 12:16:29 PM
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The Castle Inn was for the more affluent in Conwy's society.
Not much has changed!  ;D
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Trojan on February 18, 2011, 07:48:52 PM
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The Castle Inn was for the more affluent in Conwy's society.
Not much has changed!  ;D

 :)
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on February 18, 2011, 10:00:34 PM
Ok, I've merged my list with Angie's list and this is the result a total of 51 pubs! Although, I suspect one or two may be duplicates...

Why were there so many Pubs in Conwy?

1) Busy port - Fishing Boats & Timber Ships
2) Navvies working on bridges, railway and cob
3) Miners from the lead mines in the countryside nearby
4) Conwy on Post route from Ireland to London

Conwy's pubs, past and present, vanished and in other uses
(those marked * are still running as pubs today):


The Albion Vaults* (6 Uppergate Street)
The Anchor  Uppergate Street (Could be same as Crown & Anchor or Hope & Anchor possibly?)
The Black Horse (West side of Castle Street - immediately to left of Aberconwy house) (In existence in 1795)
The Black Lion (Lyon) (now semi-derelict, Castle Street) (In existence in 1795) (Landlord 1895 - David Roberts)
The Blue Bell* (Castle Street) (Landlord in 1856 - Edward Jones)
The Boot Inn (now r/h side of Alfredos, Lancaster Square) (In existence in 1795) (William Lardner - Landlord in 1798)
The Bull (distinct from the Bull's Head, no idea as to location - any ideas?) (In existence in 1795)
The Bull's Head (High Street, by present Bull Cottages)
The Bridge* (Rosehill Street)
The Britannia Castle Street (Chinese Takeaway opposite NatWest Bank)
The Carpenters Arms (No 6 Berry Street)
The Castle Inn/Hotel* (High Street)(Landlady 1856 - Cordelia Owen)
The Castle View (Bangor Road, Old Co-op Building))
The Cockpit (in vicinity of the Cockpit)
The Commercial Inn Mrs Jane Fielding Llanrwst Rd Gyffin (1929)
The Conway Castle (No. 3 Berry Street) (Thomas Jones - Landlord in 1798)
The Conway [Conwy] Ferry (1798)(Landlady - Mary Davies)
The Conway [Conwy] Mariner (In existence in 1795)(Landlord - Thomas Jones)
The Crown and Anchor, Conwy (Landlord - John Jones)
The Crown Vaults Tavern (High Street, same side as Plas Mawr - Edwards Butchers Shop site?) (Miss Mary Annie Davies - Landlady 1910)
The Cross Keys, Conwy (In existence in 1903)
The Eagles Inn (Now Fisherman's Chip Shop, Castle Street) (In existence in 1795)
The Eccles Inn (Could this be a misspelling of Eagles Inn?)
The Feathers (7 Lancaster Square - currently the Post Office) (Richard Lewis - Landlord in 1798)
The Foresters Arms (Gyffin, now a private house)
The George & Dragon* (21 Castle Street)(Formerly the Tal Y Cafn)
The Hall, Conwy (Landlord - John Thomas)
The Harp Hotel (High Street, where Spar (former Woolworths) is now) (Roger Rous - Landlord in 1798)(formerly The Newborough)
The Hope and Anchor, Conwy (Landlord - Robert Jones)   
The Joiners Arms (other side of Wing Gate Wall)(now house called Glanrafon)
The Kings Head (now l/h side of Castle Hotel)(Later known as Castle Vaults)
The Liverpool Arms* (on the Quay)
The Mail Coach/Coach & Horses* (High Street)
The Malt Loaf/Erskine Arms Hotel* (Rosehill Street) (Erskine Refreshment Room - on current car park)(Erskine Tap Room - Church Street)
The Mostyn Arms - Castle Street
The New Inn
The Newbridge Arms (Newborough Terrace)
The Old Bull's Head (High Street, in area where Bull Cottages are now)
The Pen y Grisia, Conway [Conwy] (1798)(Landlady - Catherine Jones)
The Plough Inn (site now occupied by Beresford Adams, Lancaster Square)
The Plough Bach (to left of Plough Inn (above))
The Railway Tavern, No.1 York Place, Conwy
The Red Lion (Lyon) (on High Street, opposite Conwy Pantry) (In existence in 1795)
The Rising Gull (Berry Street)
The Royal Oak Tavern (house to right of 'Smallest House' on Quay)
The Ship Tavern (now Pen Y Bryn Tearooms, High Street) (In existence in 1795)
The Ship (Castle Street)(next to the Eagles)
The Soldiers Rest (by Berry Street Arch) (May also have been called Soldiers Arms)
The Sun, Conway (In existence in 1795 - Mary Jones Landlady)
The Swan (Berry Street, 'up entry by old Co-op')
The Union Tavern (Chapel Street - now Hen Dafarn house?)
The White Horse (Uppergate Street - next to the Albion)
The White Lion, Conwy (Landlord - Nathaniel Atkinson)
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on February 18, 2011, 10:14:01 PM
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In the above post it mentions the Kings Head as a farmers house with a cock pit at the back.  At first I thought this pub would be situated on Bangor Road mainly because of the "cock pit".  It was actually situated next door to the Castle Inn on high street.  The Castle Hotel on the High Street in Conwy was at one time the site of both these pubs with the "cock pit" out the back.  The reason The Kings Head was referred to as a farmers house was because this was the common pub where farm labourers and fishermen would drink while The Castle Inn was for the more affluent in Conwy's society.
The Kings Head:

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Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on February 18, 2011, 10:26:15 PM
The Albion in 2010:

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Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on February 19, 2011, 10:32:02 AM
It seems that times are not good for pubs called 'Albion'. The one in Llanrwst is up for sale at just £120,000 - a great position on the square and a large building. You can see it in this pic, the stone faced building on the left:

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3399/4650474612_75d4b09928_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/4650474612/)
Llanrwst Almshouses Festival (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/4650474612/#) by davidrobertsphotography (http://www.flickr.com/people/davellandudno/), on Flickr

"ALBION, LLANRWST North Wales Snowdonia National Park Town
Centre Pub. Open plan split level trade bar with lounge and
games area. Four bedroom owners accommodation. Trade garden.
Freehold Offers around £120,000 (33059)"
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on February 19, 2011, 07:19:09 PM
Advert for the Harp Hotel/Pub on Castle Street, Conwy, Now the site of the Spar (former Woolworths):

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Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on February 19, 2011, 07:51:25 PM
Angie has passed to me a lot of information about old Conwy, which I am in the process of digitising. Here is an article about the Castle Hotel, High Street that has been scanned from the original document and then read using OCR:

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5288/5293703358_0faeb654dc.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5293703358/)
Castle Hotel, Conwy (http://www.flickr.com/photos/davellandudno/5293703358/#) by davidrobertsphotography (http://www.flickr.com/people/davellandudno/), on Flickr


The Castle Hotel at Conway, twenty—odd miles from Denbigh, like its namesake at Ruthin,
is a combination of two old inns: the Castle, which doubtless had another name in its
early days, and the King's Head. Both show a modern front to the street, a construction
of 1885, but behind this there is, in the case of the humbler King's Head, much heavy
oak timberwork of the earlier l500s at least, and in the case of the Castle, a coaching
inn of the later period, with subsequent modernizations. But the oldest part of all is
in the big stableyard at the back where portions of the wall dividing the inn premises
from the churchyard are believed to be the remains of a twelfth—century Cistercian
Abbey upon part of the site of which the inn was first built.

The two inns were of very different character. The King's Head was a farmers' house.
In its back garden was a Cock Pit which was used at times, as old inhabitants tell, by
gypsies to settle their quarrels with the fists. From the little stone building at the
end of the garden spectators watched both cocks and gypsies in combat.
The Castle was the house of the "quality", the "Head Inn" of Aberconway as it used to
be called. Here the reception was held to George Stevenson to celebrate the opening of
his Tubular Bridge across the Conway river in 1848, and here the coaches stopped to
change horses in the stableyard.

There is a rare survival of those days to be seen in one of the existing stable build-
ings. It is now used as a coal store, just inside the door to the left is a small recess
or cupboard. An old customer of the King's Head who worked in the stableyard as a boy
over fifty years ago says that he was told by old men at that time that this cupboard
was originally closed by an iron door, and in it Mail Coach drivers looked up their
time bills, countersigned by the postmaster who supplied the change of horses, certifying
the time of arrival and departure of each coach.

It is possible that more than is realized of these old stable buildings is of monastic
masonry. The Abbey was removed nearly 700 years ago when Conway castle was built and the
town fortified by the walls that still surround it, for Conway is one of the few walled
towns left. Later there was on its site a building known as the "Spital," probably a
mediaeval Guest House, and out of that the first inn may have developed. Old foundations
have been found here from time to time, skeletons, a tombstone and a font to suggest
tales of the Castle's very long ago past.

In more modern times the house has acquired a reputation for its large collection of
old Welsh furniture, and for the mural paintings, mostly of Shakespearian scenes done
towards the end of the last century by two well—known artists, Dawson Watson and
Bernard Ousey. A much older painting was discovered in the inn some sixty years ago.
Dirty and neglected, eventually it was cleaned and proved to be a portrait inscribed
"Dame Penderel l662." Dame Penderel was the mother of the two brothers who hid the
fugitive King Charles II in the oak tree at Boscobel, and the picture, it was discovered,
had been given to a former owner of the Castle by two old ladies, connected with the
Penderel family, who lived not far from Boscobel. A photograph of the portrait hangs in
the lounge, the original is now in the town museum, close by.

( "Tales of Old Inns, by Richard Keverne. pub: Collins. 1959. pages 162 — l64.)
" Owen’s Castle Inn Conway was sold up in November 1841"
" Edward son of Merydith nailor was married to the old Servant Maid
Castle Inn Conway Octr 23/52."
(Extracts from Chronicle of Events by Thomas Roberts,postmaster of Conway.)
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on February 27, 2011, 04:31:41 PM
I went to St Benedicts Church today in Gyffin.  The parish church of Gyffin, dedicated to St Benedict. This is a small church on an ancient site. The earliest part of the building is 12th century. Bishop Richard Davies, translator of the Bible, was baptised here in the 16c.
The entrance to the church is clearly very old.  I had a good look round, there's some very old graves here too. I noticed a few old landlords from the 1800s are buried here. I'll make arrangements to meet the vicar sometime this week and see if I can uncover more. On the old church door I could see an inscription from the 1600s. graffiti was "in" then too.  :o
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on February 27, 2011, 04:41:19 PM
John Williams was the landlord of the White Horse (next door to the Albion) On February 8th 1868 his wife Ann died aged 56.  John Williams then married a lady called Elizabeth who died 3 years later aged 44 in 1871. Both graves are in St Benedict's. John Williams was a bit of a ladies man then? 
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Trojan on February 28, 2011, 05:19:52 PM
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I went to St Benedicts Church today in Gyffin.  The parish church of Gyffin, dedicated to St Benedict.

 *&(

 8)
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on March 24, 2011, 01:02:33 PM
Some futher information reguarding the pubs of Conwy.  Again all researched by Rob Pritchard and his late father.

Notes on individual Pubs of Conwy.

Albion –  6 Uppergate Street

P D C    1886  Humphrey Griffith
S T D    1886  Edward Roberts

Black lion – Next door to Blue Bell

S D N W 1856  David Roberts
P D C      1886  Thomas Jones
S T D      1886  Thomas Jones

Mr Goodall of the Black Lion Conwy was buried 28th May 1850.

Edward Williams late of the Black Lion Conwy fell from a tree 21st feb 1851.  He died Sunday night about 10pm.
23rd Feb 1851. Buried on the 27th – he was born 1792.

Black Horse – Castle Street – Veals bakery

S D N W  1856  Thomas Roberts
P D C       1886  Robert Pritchard
S T D       1886  Elizabeth Owen

Charles Roberts son of the Black Horse died Dec 19th 1837
John Roberts late of the Old Black Horse died in London 19th june 1843


Boot Inn – Lancaster Square – Alfredos

S D N W  1856  Thomas Evans
P D C       1886  William Davies
S T D       1886  William Davies

S P D  1886  Sarah Dutton
S T D  1886  Sarah Dutton

Bridge – Castle Street

Blue Bell – Castle Street

S D N W  1856  Edward Jones
S P D C   1886  John Smallwood
S T D      1886  John Trevor

Edward Jones Blue Bell was married to Catherine Lardner of the Boot, Conwy on Sunday Jan 25th 1825.
Elizabeth Jones daughter of Elizabeth Jones Blue Bell Conwy buried 14th Sept 1843.



Britannia – Castle Street – (Bob Parry Bookmakers.)

Bulls Head – High Street – (Bull Cotages)

Castle View – Rosehill Street – (Old Co-Op)

P D C  1886  Abram Thomas
S T D  1886  Thomas Abram

Coach and Horses – High Street

S D N W  1856  Owen Williams


Castle Hotel – Also Castle Inn – High Street

S D N W  1856  Cordelia Owen

Conwy Castle – No 3 Berry Street

S D N W  1856  John Jones

The Feathers – Bangor Road – (Sunway Travel)


Foresters Arms – Arfon Tee Gyffin

P D C  1886  John Hughes

Carpenters Arms – No6 Berry Street

Crown – High Street – ( Barclays Bank)

S D N W  1856  Hugh Jones
P D C       1886  Elizabeth Davies
S T D       1886  Elizabeth Davies

Eccles Inn - ? (by the looks of it, I think the Eccles is a spelling mistake)

P D C     1886  Humphrey Williams

Eagles – Castle Street – (Milk Bar)

S T D      1886  Humphrey Williams

Erskine Arms Hotel – Rose Hill Street –(Malt Loaf)

S D N W  1856  Richard Williams
B D C       1886  R T Roberts

Also Reskine refreshment room – now car park opposite Malt Loaf

Erskine Tap Room – Church Street

George an Dragon – Castle Street – (formerly Tal Y Cafn)

S D N W   1856  Richard Wyche
P D C        1886  Margaret Jones
S T D        1886  John Smallwood



Harp Inn – High Street – (Formerly The Newborough) (Was Woolworths now Spar and Chatterbox)

S D N W 1856  Catherine Edwards (The Newbourough Arms)
P D C      1886  Jane Williams
S T C       1886  Jane and Ellen Williams

Joiners Arms – Glan Rafon – The Quay

S D N W   1856  Robert Jones

Mail Coach – High street

S D N W   1856  Robert Davies
P D C        1886  Jane Evans
S T D        1886  Catherine Thomas

New Inn - ?

Newborough Arms – The Harp

Kings Head – Later Castle Vaults - High Street – Next to Castle Hotel

S T D     1886  John Ellis

Liverpool Arms – The Quay

P D C    1886  Catherine Roberts
S T D    1886  William Thomas

Mostyn Arms – Castle Street

Union – Chapel Street – (opposite Seion Chapel Schoolroom)





Royal Oak – The Quay

S D N W     1856  J Roberts
P D C          1886  Robert Roberts
S D N W   1856   Robert Roberts

The Ship – Castle Street (next to the Eagles)

Soldiers o – Between Bury Street and Joiners Arms

The Ship – High Street

Railway Tavern – Lancaster Square – No1 York Place

S D N W   1856  Thomas Jones
P D C        1886  Elizabeth Duncombe
S T D        1886  Elizabeth Duncombe

Red Lion – High Street – 1st block rt hand side (sign on door)

P D C    1886  David Jones
S T D    1886  Evan Evans

Rising Gull – Berry Street – opposite old Co Op

Plough Lancaster Square – (Corner Café, down steps under Indian Restaurant)

P D C   1886  Catherine Williams

Swan – Berry Street – Up entry by the old Co-op

White Horse – Uppergate Street – Next door to the Albion

S D N W     1856  Hugh Foulks
S T D           1886  John Williams


Reasons for the large number of pubs

1.   Busy Port – Fishing and Timber Ships
2.   Navvies working on bridges on cob
3.   Miners from the lead mines
4.   Conwy on the postal route to and from Holyhead.

Retailers of Beer 1856

Hugh Hughes – Lancaster Square
William Hughes – High Street
Robert Jones – Lancaster Square
John Roberts – High Street
William Roberts – Castle Street
Elizabeth Thomas – castle Street

Sources

Slaters Directory of North Wales 1856 (SDNW)
Postal Directory of Caerns 1886 (PDC)
Slaters Trade directory 1886 (STD)


Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: suepp on March 24, 2011, 07:24:46 PM

Reasons for the large number of pubs

1.   Busy Port – Fishing and Timber Ships
2.   Navvies working on bridges on cob
3.   Miners from the lead mines
4.   Conwy on the postal route to and from Holyhead.

It was safer to drink beer than water! Z**
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on April 09, 2011, 10:42:20 AM
An advert for The Castle Hotel in Conwy.  Haven't things changed, now pubs advertise 3D Sky Sports on big screens whereas in those days they boast the fact they had ElectricLight.
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Ian on April 09, 2011, 11:23:32 AM
I like the bit about 'interchangeable meals"...   _))*
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on April 09, 2011, 11:29:28 AM
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I like the bit about 'interchangeable meals"...   _))*
Yeah what are interchangeable meals?
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on April 09, 2011, 11:42:50 AM
I was talking to Ken the landlord in the Bluebell the other day, he was telling me some of the history regarding the pub. He was told that the Bluebell used to be a court and they used to hang guilty culprits in the building.  He doesn't believe this to be true but I may have uncovered the answer as to where the notion may have evolved having read an old paperback book from Rob Pritchard.

On the east side of Castle Street is the Bluebell Inn, where was annually held during the 18th century (1700-1800) the Court Leet of the Crown Manor of Nant Conway, the twelve jurors of which were entertained to an excellent dinner at the expense of the reigning Sovereign, who was represented by the Steward of the Manor.
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Fester on April 09, 2011, 10:00:31 PM
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I like the bit about 'interchangeable meals"...   _))*

I prefer the the phone number ... the fact that there were only 13 phones in Conwy!

Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on April 18, 2011, 02:18:57 PM
September the 9th 1799 another Landlord Owen Owens was granted a license to sell ale in his pub called the
Pen y Grissia, Conway
Now I haven't a clue where this is Pen Y Grissia - Top of the steps? I've never heard or found any reference to it before.
The other problem I have is I can find so far no reference whatsoever to the Albion before 1890.  I wonder if it was called something entirely different before it's rebuild in the  1920s.  Although I do have (and its further up the page) a photo of the Albion when it was 3 storeys?  Dave what age do you think that photo is so I can narrow down my search.
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on April 18, 2011, 03:14:13 PM
Could it refer to the Old Wheelhouse maybe?
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on April 18, 2011, 03:16:27 PM
Might it be Pen Y Grisiau?

I'm thinking that photo was taken around 1900?
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on April 18, 2011, 05:06:27 PM
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Might it be Pen Y Grisiau?

I'm thinking that photo was taken around 1900?
It was printed Penygrissia all one word although it's not is it.

So if the photo is 1900 that's almost 20years until the rebuild, why no reference to it then  ?{}?
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Bri Roberts on April 18, 2011, 05:30:15 PM
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The Foresters Arms (Gyffin, now a private house)

Currently up for sale:

http://www.fletcherpoole.com/PropertyDetails.aspx?property_ID=1597 (http://www.fletcherpoole.com/PropertyDetails.aspx?property_ID=1597)
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on April 18, 2011, 06:18:08 PM
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The Foresters Arms (Gyffin, now a private house)

Currently up for sale:

http://www.fletcherpoole.com/PropertyDetails.aspx?property_ID=1597 (http://www.fletcherpoole.com/PropertyDetails.aspx?property_ID=1597)

I was only talking to a fella about this the other day.  In theory you could get a premises License  ;D
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on May 16, 2011, 05:37:09 PM
I checked with the Land Registry today - the Albion is still owned by Punch Partnerships Limited.
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on May 16, 2011, 06:52:54 PM
Aaaah  $angry$  $angry$

I give up  >?>??

but then why would they remove the metal door and window cover?  I reckon the sale is still going through
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: gazwil on July 08, 2011, 06:52:36 PM
Just checking but I believe the Harp on High St. was situated right next to the Castle Hotel- across the alley where the sweet shop is now. There is a photo of a march past in front of the harp in the bar of the Castle. The pub was demolished just before the last war and had been leased out from the Glynllifon Estate. I have a copy of the lease from the 1920s and a postcard of High St. showing the pub.
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: martin on November 24, 2011, 07:06:14 PM
I have just been watching the local BBC news and they mentioned something about micro breweries and the re-opening of the Albion in Conwy.  Does anyone have any information on this or was I seeing/hearing things?  Z**
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: dwsi on November 24, 2011, 08:47:07 PM
you can see a chopped down version of the report again here -> BBC News - Tax break boosts micro brewery numbers in Wales http://bbc.in/uM1Lye (http://bbc.in/uM1Lye)
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on January 21, 2012, 03:59:02 PM
The Albion will be reopening on February 3rd. I'm sure we wish them all the best with their new enterprise.
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: DaveR on January 21, 2012, 04:00:54 PM
The Bluebell Pub in Castle Street is a sorry sight at the moment. There must be people still living there though, you can see a person standing in the window on the upper floor:

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Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: snowcap on January 21, 2012, 04:41:09 PM
it,s not a spirit then?
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: martin on January 21, 2012, 04:43:35 PM
 $donald$ $donald$
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on July 25, 2012, 10:55:13 PM
Here is some more information I have found on the old pubs of Conwy.

All this information is credited to a gentleman named Ray castle (a former scout leader from Conwy)

The Crown inn/Crown Vaults or Crown Tavern.

This pub was where Ieuan Edwards butchers shop is now at the foot of Crown lane.

Below is the list of people who lived in The Crown

1837   John Jones of the Crown Inn dies, aged 82
1844-51  Ann Jones named in documents as licensee of the Crown. She is aged 72 in 1851
1856-59   Hugh Jones is licensee
1861   Grace Jones is licensee, aged 39 
1868   Grace Eccleston
1874   Robert Davies
1880-95   Elizabeth Davies
1899   J Davies
1901 and 1903  Directories name no licensee for the Crown Vaults
1910   Council permits building alterations
1911   David William Jones, plumber, occupies the building
1922   A directory lists the building as void
1925  Barclays Bank


The Black Lion (next door to the Blue bell)

For years it was believed that the house dated from 1589 the date above the door.  However tests were done on the beams in 2010 and proved the joists were infact felled 1441-42 and so it's older than Aberconwy house.

Below is the list of past occupants

John Brickdall lived here 1589 to 1607. He married on 10 May 1578, had at least six children and died in 1607, the year the Black Death decimated Conwy’s population.

Hugh Jones of the Black Lion died aged 40, 1789 

The “Black Lyon” was occupied by Hugh Hughes, 1790 

Chief rent for “Brigdale House” was 7s 4d, 1798-1800

William Williams was alehouse keeper at the Black Lion, 1801 

Edwards Williams (d.1851) named as licensee in directories 1828-35

John Davies named as licensee, 1844-51

David Roberts named as licensee, 1856-61

Another Edward Williams named as licensee, 1868-79

Thomas Jones named innkeeper, 1881-90

Black Lion bought by Grace Elen Jones for £330, 1890

The 1891 Census lists Thomas Jones, Licensed Victualler, a 9-year-old grand-daughter, a nephew (railway clerk), a daughter (barmaid) and her husband (a pig dealer from Caernarfon), plus two visiting pig-dealers from Macclesfield, Cheshire

Property acquired by Ind Coope brewery in 1897

Hugh Jones named as licensee, 1911-29

W H Morgan, electrical engineer, was operating his business here in 1932 and bought the proprety in 1935. It closed as an inn on 31 March 1935

W H Morgan let the front of the building to the Curran family (Irish) for their sweetshop, and to his ex-wife Bessie Jones, who ran a teashop business here from 1952

Ann Wilkes-Jones bought the building c.1958. With her parents, she ran an antiques business and teashop, also selling books and gifts, here. The business closed in the late 1970s, leaving the building empty

The Wilkes family sold the building to car repairer Ian Hughes in 2002. He began a restoration but family circumstances intervened. He never lived here. One of his employees created the jackdaws on the roof. In 2007 the building was placed on the market with an asking price of £281,500

Accountant Angharad Jones bought the building in April 2008

The Bridge


1868-75 William Abram, Castle View Hotel, a temperance hotel       
1880-96 Thomas Abram
1899 Miss Davies is proprietress of the Bridge Hotel, Family and Commercial
1911 Oscar J Yates
1913 AA Kerridge
1918 HB Middleton, proprietor
1922 A Middleton
1922 John William Morgan 
1928 Building Control plans approved for alterations to Bridge Hotel for Ind Coope & Co Ltd
1960 J Pitt, proprietor
2011 (June) New landlady is Lynne Plumb. Owner of pub is Marstons Breweries
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: Pendragon on July 26, 2012, 07:29:50 PM
The Boot Inn Conwy, now Alfedos restaurant


1798 William Lardner, landlord

1828 Richard Lardner

1835 Catherine Lardner

1844-1847 Rowland Jones

1850-1851 Jane Jones and son Robert

1856-1859 Thomas Evans

1861-1868 Mary Smith

1874-1875 R Prichard

1880-1885/6 William Davies

1889 H D Williams.

1889-1895 M Dougall, Boot Inn

1911-1922 Mrs Margaret Dougall

1925-1926 Evan Jones

1929 Mrs AS Jones

1932-1939 Mrs ME Jones

Thanks to Ray Castle for this information.


The Black Horse where the bakery is now, next door to the Traditional Sweet Shop Castle street Conwy.


1825 Thomas Aneurin Roberts born at Black Horse (his father was landlord). He became headmaster of Conwy’s National School and Conwy postmaster in 1842.
1834-1856 Licensee Thomas Roberts (memorial inscription to him in St Mary’s Church)
1868-1875 Silence Roberts
1880 John Evans
1881-1886 Elizabeth Owen
1886 Robert Prichard
1895 Margaret Jones
1899 J C Smallwood
1911-14 Main part of premises is Emu Restaurant, run by John Roberts
1915-1929 Main part is the Victoria Tea Rooms, run by M Theo Jones
1932-67 Main part is the Victoria Café, run by Gerald Veale
1967-96 Main part is Veale’s Bakery, run by Brian Veale
1998-present Main part is Popty Conwy Bakery

All this information is credited to a gentleman named Ray castle (a former scout leader from Conwy)
Title: Re: Pubs of Conwy
Post by: sgbright on June 06, 2013, 12:07:28 PM
According to an old will I have in the 1870s and the 1911 census there was also a george & dragon at 12 bridge st llanrwst.  any thoughts?